UM News http://www.umac.mo/ $title en_us hourly 1<![CDATA[UM awards scholarships to outstanding students]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/txt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43066http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/txt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43066The University of Macau (UM) recently awarded scholarships to 131 outstanding students at the UM Scholarship Presentation Ceremony 2017. More than UM 400 students received scholarships in the past year.

In his speech, UM Rector Wei Zhao congratulated the scholarship recipients and expressed gratitude to the scholarship donors. ‘The donations from various institutions and individuals show recognition of the university’s effort in promoting higher education development in Macao in the past three decades,’ said Rector Zhao. ‘I am very happy to see the students’ outstanding achievements in various areas. Their achievements speak of the effectiveness of the university’s 4G strategy: Great Professors, Great Buildings, Great Knowledge, and Great Character.’ Rector Zhao hopes the students will continue to pursue their dreams and give back to society.

During the ceremony, one of the recipients, Ho Pak Ki, a second-year student from the Faculty of Arts and Humanities (FAH) and a member of Chao Kuang Piu College, shared her experiences with the audience and thanked the scholarship donors. Hu Lizao, another second-year student from the FAH and a member of Stanley Ho East Asia College, gave a music performance with a Chinese hammered dulcimer.

In the 2016/2017 academic year, UM received a total of MOP 4 million in academic prizes and scholarships from more than 50 institutions and individuals. The awards and scholarships were presented to students at the university’s convocation ceremony, congregation ceremony, as well as the honorary degree and higher degree conferment ceremony. At this ceremony, 131 UM students received scholarships worth a total of MOP 1.1 million, donated by 33 institutions and individuals.

The scholarships presented at the ceremony included AmCham Macau Scholarship, Wynn Macau Scholarship, Wynn Macau Whole Person Development Scholarship, Sir Run Run Shaw Scholarship, HSBC Scholarships, Choi Kai Yau Scholarship, CTM Scholarship, Lisboa Holdings Scholarship, Macau International Airport Company Limited Scholarship, MGM Macau Elite Scholarship, Lou Tou Vo Mathematics Scholarship, Jorge Alvares Foundation Scholarship, Inspirational Youth Scholarship, L’Arc Macau Talent Recognition Program, Macao ASEAN International Chamber of Commerce Scholarship, AMCM Scholarship, Sociedade de Investimento e Desenvolvimento Predial Parry (Grupo) Limitada Scholarship, Luso International Bank Whole Person Development Scholarship, Rohde & Schwarz Wireless Communications Scholarship, BCM Scholarship, China Telecom Scholarship, Mak Heng Ip Law Firm Scholarship, Nuno Simões & Associados Scholarship, Sun Hung Kai Financial Scholarship, Macao Water Scholarship, WICH Law Firm Scholarship, Wong Seng Hong Scholarship, Leng Kuan Scholarship, Ieong Kim Long Whole Person Development Scholarship, Gloria Man Wai So Students Scholarship, Southa Group Scholarship, University of Macau (Hong Kong) Alumni Association Scholarship, AAAUM Scholarship, and CPA Australia CPA Program Scholarship.


Source: Student Affairs Office

Media Contact Information:
Communications Office, University of Macau

Albee Lei  Tel:(853) 88228004
Kelvin U  Tel:(853) 88224322
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UM Website:www.umac.mo

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<![CDATA[UM graduates its first PhD in applied physics and materials engineering]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/txt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43056http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/txt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43056Yao Lingmin from the University of Macau (UM) Institute of Applied Physics and Materials Engineering (IAPME) recently became the first PhD student to graduate from the institute after passing her thesis defense with excellence. Soon after her graduation, she was appointed an assistant professor at Guangzhou University.

Titled ‘Novel Design of Highly Oriented Titanate-Based Nanorod Array and Its Application in Nanocomposite Capacitors’, Dr Yao’s paper was unanimously praised by members of the examination committee. Yao’s supervisor was Haydn Chen, a former chair professor at UM. After completing all the coursework in the first year, Yao began a collaboration project with a research team led by Prof Zhai Jiwei from Tongji University in Shanghai and frequently travelled between Shanghai and Macao during the ensuing two years. During that period, her primary research focus was on the synthesis of composites for energy harvesting and high energy density in capacitors. She successfully designed a new structure, barium titanate-based nanorod array. Using the nanorods as fillers and PVDF as the matrix, she created a powerful electrical energy storage device. While working at UM, Dr Yao published two papers in SCI-indexed journals with high impact factors.

Established in 2014, the IAPME boasts a young and innovative research team. The institute aims to develop a new discipline in applied physics and materials engineering with local characteristics so as to develop technologies urgently needed in Macao and its neighbouring regions. It also aspires to become a domestically leading and globally impactful centre for talent training, materials engineering research, and the commercialisation of research results. The research studies at the IAPME are based on physics, geared towards application, and take the form of material design and preparation.


Source: Institute of Applied Physics and Materials Engineering

Media Contact Information:
Communications Office, University of Macau

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UM Website:www.umac.mo

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<![CDATA[Director of Education Department of Sichuan province visits UM]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/txt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43060http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/txt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43060A delegation led by Zhu Shihong, director of the Department of Education of Sichuan province, visited the University of Macau (UM). The delegation was warmly received by UM Rector Wei Zhao, Faculty of Health Sciences Dean Chuxia Deng, Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences Director Wang Yitao, and Global Affairs Office Interim Director Wong Kei. During the visit, both parties discussed higher education development and the training of professionals in the field of artificial intelligence. Rector Zhao told the guests about UM’s latest developments, including the ‘4-in-1’ model of education, the residential college (RC) system, and the university’s scientific achievements. Zhu praised UM for its advanced teaching environment and experiential learning offered by the RCs. After the meeting, the delegation visited the UM Gallery to learn more about UM’s milestones, campus design, and current development. Also on the delegation was Southwest Medical University President Mr He Yanzheng, who has been appointed a visiting professor at UM. During the meeting, Deng presented a certificate of appointment to Mr He.

For the full version, please refer to the Chinese version.


Source: Global Affairs Office

Media Contact Information:
Communications Office, University of Macau

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<![CDATA[Leaving No One Unhelped Interview with Student Counsellor Tim]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/txt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43042http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/txt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43042My UM

Tim is a social worker from the Student Counselling Section. ‘Think outside the box’ is his motto. Although he hasn’t handled many cases involving students with physical or mental disabilities since he joined the university in 2009, the challenges he has overcome in the process are numerous.

 

Finding His Calling after Repeatedly Changing Majors

After graduating from high school in Macao, Tim went to the University of Kansas in the United States to study journalism, only to find that his English was not good enough to follow the lessons effectively. So he transferred to the sociology department, but he disliked the theory-heavy courses. It wasn’t until he transferred to the School of Social Welfare that he finally found his calling—social work that helps people solve problems. After graduation from college, Tim went on to study for a master’s degree in clinical social work. The four years of undergraduate studies taught him how to help others with the resources in society, while his postgraduate studies helped him gain a deeper understanding of the different skills required in helping others. ‘Together, these trainings help me do a better job,’ he says.

 

Leaving Psychiatric Hospitals

Tim once worked in a psychiatric hospital in the US for two years. Working as a social worker at UM shares many similarities with working in the US. While working in the US, he often needed to contact different agencies and help released patients to find a place to live, which was very difficult, because most of the institutions didn’t want them.

At UM, he also needs to liaise with different departments on and off the campus, so as to help students solve their problems with available resources.

After working for two years in the US, the head of Tim’s department wanted to help Tim apply for a work permit, but the hospital didn’t feel it was necessary to use tax payers’ money to apply for a work permit for a foreigner. An optimistic person by nature, Tim didn’t feel disappointed or angry. ‘I thought I could come back to Macao. I thought it’d be good to come back and serve Macao residents.’

 

Serving the First Student with Physical Disability

Tim joined UM in 2009, about one year after the university established the Committee on Student Disability Services. ‘This is my third job after I returned to Macao,’he says.‘I am mainly responsible for providing help and support to students with physical or mental disabilities, handling student-related crises, and following up on cases involving other students with special needs.’The most unforgettable case Tim has handled involved a student named Katherine who needed to get around in a wheelchair. That was six years ago, when UM was still on the old campus, with many inconvenient staircases. So Tim had to help solve accessibility problems before Katherine arrived on campus.

The trickiest aspect was coordinating with the appropriate departments. ‘For example, I needed to find a place in the parking lot for Katherine so she could charge her electric wheelchair there after class,’ he says. ‘Also, she needed to go to classrooms on the lower ground floor in the library, but there was no elevator for students, so I asked the library if they could let Katherine use the elevator for staff, the library soon said yes, but the student had to contact the security guard first to unlock the elevator, and I spent quite some time solving these problems.’

Whenever he encounters difficulties at UM, Tim would ask himself, ‘Why can’t it be done?  I just want to help people.’Tim feels thankful that nowadays the various departments at UM are all very supportive of students with disabilities. Two years ago, Katherine received her bachelor’s degree in sociology. Earlier this year, she completed her master’s studies in Chinese/English translation. ‘Before I came to UM, I rarely sought help from social workers, but over the past six years Tim has provided a lot of help to me,’ says Katherine. ‘He completely changed my impression of social workers. He is thoughtful and patient with the students, and he often came up with solutions for me that even I couldn’t think of.’

 

The Value of Work

Accessible facilities were part of the design of the new campus. But some accessible facilities needed to be improved and adjusted after the university moved to the new campus. In the winter of 2014, after the trial use of the new campus began, Tim and a consultant on accessible facilities from Hong Kong walked around the campus for three days, discussing how to improve the designs of the ramps, entrances, exits, as well as other accessible facilities on campus. ‘We covered practically every corner. In the end we were limping,’ says Tim. Despite the various challenges, Tim believes in the value of what he does. ‘We want to build a campus that is easy to use for both able-bodied students and people with disabilities. Even if we only had one student with disabilities, we would still do our best to help and care about him/her,’ he says. 

Apart from Katherine, Tim has also helped Joe, a student with leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy who gave an interview to My UM  three years ago. Tim called his friends and institutions for the blind in Hong Kong to inquire about visual impairments. He and some colleagues from the Faculty of Business Administration even escorted Joe and his parents to Hong Kong in order to help Joe find a suitable device and learn how to adapt to changes created by his condition. ‘The most important thing for students with physical or mental disabilities is to learn to accept themselves,’ he says.‘In my experience, caring too much or providing too many services for students with disabilities would actually backfire, because that would make them feel that they are singled out for special treatment. The right attitude is to treat them in the same way you treat normal people and provide help where they really need.’

 

Greatest Reward

Tim never forgets why he became a social worker in the first place. Whatever he does at work, he follows the teaching‘to act justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly’. ‘My college professors used to tell us to set lofty goals and fight for the rights and interests of the masses, I can’t always get the resources I need, but even with limited resources, I would always do my best,’he says.‘I always feel the happiest when I see a student gradually learns to accept herself and becomes more confident. If the students I have helped can achieve something worthwhile after graduation, it would be the greatest reward for my work.’

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<![CDATA[Recipient of UM Teaching Excellence Award to give talk on innovative teaching methods next Wednesday]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/txt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43045http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/txt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43045The University of Macau (UM) on 27 September will hold the UM Teaching Excellence Award Seminar. Li Zihao, an assistant professor from the Faculty of Education and the first recipient of the UM Teaching Excellence Award, will be the keynote speaker. He will give a talk titled ‘Teaching in a Digital Era with Wicked Approaches’. During the talk, Li will share his insights on innovative teaching methods and discuss how to incorporate technology in the classroom. All are welcome.

The UM Teaching Excellence Award was established in the 2016/2017 academic year to recognise, on an annual basis, a distinguished member of the academic staff who has demonstrated excellence as an educator. The award also signifies the importance placed by the university on the pursuit of teaching excellence and the enhancement of student learning experience.

The talk will take place at 5:00pm in Mr and Mrs Lau Chor Tak Lecture Theatre, Anthony Lau Building, UM (E4-G078). It will be conducted in English, with simultaneous interpretation into mandarin. Those who are interested please register at https://isw.umac.mo/evm/register/award_li. For enquiries, please call 8822 4504.


Source: Communications Office

Media Contact Information:
Communications Office, University of Macau

Albee Lei  Tel:(853) 88228004
Kelvin U  Tel:(853) 88224322
Email:prs.media@umac.mo

UM Website:www.umac.mo

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<![CDATA[Where There Are Trees, There Is Hope Post-Disaster Tree Rescue Measures on Campus]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/txt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43032http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/txt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43032Source: My UM

Typhoon Hato pummeled Macao, leaving a trail of devastation in the city. Apart from heart-wrenching deaths and enormous financial losses, the typhoon also felled a large number of trees in Macao, 7,000 of which are on the UM campus. Many faculty members and students lament that the beautiful campus was destroyed in one day. But where there are trees, there is hope.

The Campus Management and Development Office (CMDO) took immediate action after the typhoon to rescue the trees in order to restore the campus to its previous beauty. In this issue’s cover story, we interview some colleagues and students who are involved in the tree rescue operation.

Rescuing Every Tree with a Chance of Survival

Our reporter went to the Central Avenue on campus after the typhoon, and what she saw pained her. The waterfront once shaded by trees, the most beautiful sight on campus, is now littered with damaged trees, some entirely uprooted, others with amputated branches or bark.

Of the around 20,000 trees on campus, more than 7,000 were felled during the typhoon. As soon as the disaster was over, the CMDO swung into action.

In addition to repairing damaged classrooms and other teaching facilities, the office also sent workers to rescue the trees. On the first day following the typhoon, workers couldn’t find cranes to restand the trees, so they had to do it manually. It took at least ten workers to stand up one tree. CMDO Director Dick Lai understood that in the battle to rescue the trees, time was of the essence. ‘There was not a minute to waste,’ he says. ‘The longer we waited, the slimmer our chances of saving them, because trees will die from loss of water in the roots.’

The CMDO hired additional vehicles and professional gardeners to rescue those trees with a chance of survival. Every day, gardeners wearing straw hats worked under the scorching sun to save the fallen trees with the help of cranes, at a rate of 200 to 250 trees a day. Now, the first-phase post-typhoon tree rescue operation has been completed. Restanding fallen trees is only the first step. Big holes need to be dug on the ground. Soil needs to be replenished. Dead roots, branches, and leaves need to be removed to reduce water loss. And all these must be performed by professional gardeners.

According to Lai, the CMDO’s top priority during the first-phase tree rescue operation was to save every tree that has a reasonable chance of survival. 3,500 trees fell into this category. Every day, workers kept the roots of the trees moist with cotton cloths, and watered the trees with the remaining plant watering systems at fixed times, as well as plant watering vehicles, once in the morning and once at night. They also removed the dead branches and leaves to minimise water loss and increase the trees’ chances of survival.

Assisting with Post-disaster

Recovery on Campus Joseph Lin, who joined UM five years ago, is in charge of gardening and landscaping affairs on campus. Needless to say, he feels very sad to see the trees in his care badly damaged in the typhoon. ‘Trees are living things. They are like my family. We won’t give up on any tree as long as there is a chance of saving it,’he says.

Currently, Macao is in severe shortages of manpower, cranes, and other types of equipment for restanding the fallen trees. Lai’s office was faced with the same problem. Rescuing so many trees within a short period of time in the absence of sufficient resources posed a huge challenge to the CMDO. Luckily, a group of dedicated CMDO colleagues were willing to work overtime without any complaint. ‘Our colleagues spent a lot of time and energy growing the trees, so we all feel very sad, but we are confident that we will revive them the best we can,’says Lai.

New Greening Plan

To restore the campus to its previous beauty, Lai, Lin, and their colleagues have made a new greening plan. According to the plan, they will review the varieties, density, and distribution of the trees. They will also increase the area of lawns and shrubs. All these measures are designed to beautify the campus in a way that improves its capacity to resist disasters. Moreover, Lai’s office will learn lessons from Typhoon Hato and implement a new greening plan on campus. At some locations, trees will be replaced by wind-resistant shrubs. More sloping fields will be created, and different kinds of flowers and shade trees will be planted. ‘Of course, it will take some time before the new trees grow up to provide shade, but we hope that in time these measures will bring back our beautiful green campus,’ he says.

Our Pains

When the typhoon was over, 500 UM faculty members, staff, and students worked on and off the campus as volunteers, helping to clean up debris and rubbish on the streets.

Simon Lok Chon Wai was one of them. Lok feels sad that many trees in Macao that used to provide shade have been damaged. ‘Colleagues in charge of gardening affairs on campus have been working very hard to save the trees,’ says Lok. ‘I hope that with everyone working together, we will have our beautiful campus back as soon as possible.’

Song Zhihao is a postgraduate from the Faculty of Law. On the first day when classes were suspended after the typhoon, he joined a volunteer team initiated by some UM students. The sight of the typhoon-ravaged campus filled his heart with sadness; it also made him more acutely aware of the power of nature. ‘Man is powerless against the might of nature,’ he says. ‘I hope to continue to assist with tree rescue work on campus to restore our campus to its former beauty.’

Apple Wong is a fourth-year student from the Department of Economics and a member of Lui Che Woo College. During the typhoon, she voluntarily assisted with relief goods distribution in Ilha Verde. She feels very sad to see the devastation in Macao caused by the typhoon. Over the past four years, she has witnessed the seedlings slowly growing into tall trees, only to have the typhoon wipe out many of them in one day. But she chooses to be optimistic. ‘The trees have been damaged, but we can save them or grow new ones,’she says. ‘I hope we can stay positive and work together to rebuild our campus. In the future, I will remind myself to cherish the gifts of nature more.’

Iao Chon Hou is a second-year student from the Faculty of Law and a member of the Henry Fok Pearl Jubilee College. On the second day after the typhoon, Iao worked as a volunteer in Macao, cleaning up the debris and rubbish, removing amputated branches from the streets, and delivering relief goods to those in need.‘Seeing so many trees felled by the typhoon, I feel like I have lost some good friends. Trees are also living things, and it takes a long time to grow them. This disaster made me realise how insignificant and helpless humans are in the face of natural disasters. So it’s important to live in the moment,’ he says. Saddened by the number of trees lost during the typhoon, Iao has decided to use less paper in the future and take part in the activities on the Tree Planting Day.


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<![CDATA[UM holds exhibition of abstract paintings by Zhang Mo]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/txt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43014http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/txt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43014The University of Macau (UM) Centre for Chinese History and Culture and Research Centre for Humanities in South China recently held an opening ceremony for an exhibition of abstract paintings by the poet and painter Zhang Mo. Held in the university library, the event aims to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the birth of Chinese new poetry. Guests attending the ceremony included Zhang and his wife; Hao Yufan, dean of UM’s Faculty of Social Sciences and director of the Centre for Chinese History and Culture; Paul Pang, dean of students at UM; Zhu Shoutong, deputy director of the Centre for Chinese History and Culture; Raymond Wong, assistant librarian of UM; and Gong Gang, academic manager of UM’s Research Centre for Humanities in South China. The exhibition is now being held in the university library and will last until 23 September. 

For more information of the exhibition, please visit:
http://www.umac.mo/news-centre/news-and-events/event-calendar/event-information/43046


Source: Centre for Chinese History and Culture

Media Contact Information:
Communications Office, University of Macau

Albee Lei  Tel:(853) 88228004
Kelvin U  Tel:(853) 88224322
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UM Website:www.umac.mo

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<![CDATA[UM students win 3 golds at 13th National Student Sports Game]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/txt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/42985http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/txt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/42985Two University of Macau (UM) students won three gold, two silver, and two bronze medals at the 13th National Student Sports Game. The two students are Chao Man Hou, a fourth-year student from the Faculty of Social Sciences; and Lei On Kei, a postgraduate student from the Faculty of Education.

On the first day of the competition, Chao and Lei each won a gold medal, in the men’s 100-metre breaststroke category and the women’s 100-metre breaststroke category, respectively. Chao then won another gold medal in the men’s 200-metre breaststroke category, as well as a silver medal in the men’s 50-metre breaststroke category on the last day of the event.

In addition to a gold medal, Lei also won a bronze medal in the women’s 50-metre breaststroke category, as well as a silver medal and another bronze medal.

 

Source & Photo: Happy Macao

Media Contact Information:
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<![CDATA[UM PhD student serves as art consultant and judge at international music festival]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/txt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/42976http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/txt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/42976Sheng Mei, a PhD student from the University of Macau (UM) Faculty of Arts and Humanities, earlier served as an art consultant and judge at an international music festival held in the United Kingdom. The festival included performances in vocal music, folk music, piano music, orchestral music, and dance. Outstanding artists from different parts of the world, including China, Singapore, the United Kingdom, and Italy, were invited to serve as art consultants and judges at the festival. This is the second time that Sheng has served on the judging panel of the festival. 

For the full version, please refer to the Chinese version.


Source: Faculty of Arts and Humanitities

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UM Website:www.umac.mo

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<![CDATA[Team led by UM scholars wins 1 silver, 1 bronze, 1 honorary award at International Sustainable World Energy Engineering Environment Project Olympiad]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/txt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/42958http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/txt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/42958A team of pre-college students from Macao, led by Prof Lee Ming Yuen and Dr Wang Ruibing from the Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences (ICMS), University of Macau (UM), recently won a silver medal, a bronze medal, and an honorary award, at the International Sustainable World Energy Engineering Environment Project Olympiad 2017. The event attracted over 1,000 students from more than 60 countries and regions. This year, over 700 scientific projects were submitted to the competition and were reviewed by an evaluation panel formed by more than 300 experts from different parts of the world. UM is committed to promoting science education and providing scientific training for secondary school teachers and students. In collaboration with a local association, the ICMS recently held an activity to promote biological education and experiments. The event attracted over 500 teachers from primary and secondary schools.

For full version, please refer to the Chinese version.

Source: Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences

Media Contact Information:
Communications Office, University of Macau

Albee Lei  Tel:(853) 88228004
Kelvin U  Tel:(853) 88224322
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UM Website:www.umac.mo

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