UM News http://www.umac.mo/ $title pt_pt hourly 1<![CDATA[Forum on traditional Chinese philosophy and contemporary culture opens at UM]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/42200http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/42200Across Golden Bridge: Forum on Traditional Chinese Philosophy and the Development of Contemporary Culture, opened at the University of Macau (UM) today (27 June), attracting prominent community members from mainland China and Macao, faculty and students from UM, teachers and students from Hou Kong Middle School, and local residents. During the three-day forum, participants will have in-depth discussions on the relationship between traditional Chinese philosophy and the development of contemporary culture as well as how traditional philosophy drives the development of traditional Chinese culture. The event was initiated by the China Cultural Media Group Limited under the Ministry of Culture, and jointly organised by UM’s Centre for Chinese History and Culture, and World Chinese Association in Macao.


For the full version, please refer to the Chinese version.
Source: Faculty of Social Sciences

Media Contact Information:
Communications Office, University of Macau

Albee Lei  Tel:(853) 88228004
Kelvin U  Tel:(853) 88224322
Email:prs.media@umac.mo

UM Website:www.umac.mo

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<![CDATA[UM’s 4Gs: Great Buildings, Great Professors, Great Knowledge, Great Character]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/42205http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/42205Text: Ella Cheong    Photo: Editorial Board

Mr Mei Yiqi once said: ‘­ The greatness of a university lies not in great buildings, but in great professors.’ In 2014, the University of Macau (UM) relocated to a one-square-kilometre new campus that is approximately 20 times the size of the old campus. Seizing the unprecedented opportunity brought by the new campus, UM successfully recruited many world-renowned scholars in different fields. In addition to recruiting high-calibre professors, the university also regularly invites intellectual titans, including recipients of the Nobel Prize, Turing Prize, and Fields Medal, to give lectures on campus in order to broaden students’ horizons. In addition, the university has implemented a ‘4-in-1’ model of education to help students develop self-knowledge and self-confidence.

In this issue’s cover story, we discuss how UM produces students with multidisciplinary talent who work to develop ‘great knowledge’ and ‘great character’ by continuously reflecting, exploring, and innovating.

Create Better Conditions to Attract the Best People

UM’s relocation to the new campus in 2014 not only allowed the university to pursue its educational goals in a better environment, but also gave the university an advantage in recruiting high-calibre faculty. How does UM take advantage of the new environment and new educational philosophy to produce outstanding graduates?


Great Buildings

­Thanks to the great support of the central government and the Macao government, UM in 2014 relocated to a new campus which covers one square kilometre, is about 20 times the size of the old campus, and has more than 60 buildings. Moreover, the new campus is physically located on Hengqin Island, Zhuhai, Guangdong province, but is under the jurisdiction of the Macao Special Administrative Region. After moving to the new campus, UM established a complete residential college system, which is also the largest such system in Asia. ­ is residential college system and the unique ‘4-in-1’ education model enable the university to provide a multifaceted education to students so they can grow into well-rounded people with a global mindset.

With the move to the new campus, the university relocated the various existing faculties, including the Faculty of Arts and Humanities, the Faculty of Business Administration, the Faculty of Education, the Faculty of Law, the Faculty of Social Sciences, the Faculty of Science and Technology, and the Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences (ICMS). In addition, UM established a new faculty after relocation to the new campus, namely the Faculty of Health Sciences (FHS), with Prof Chuxia Deng, a leading Chinese American scientist in the field of life sciences, serving as the dean. Located in one of the Research Buildings, the FHS has several research centres and institutes focused on different areas of research, including the Cancer Centre; the Centre of Reproduction, Development & Aging; and the Institute of Translational Medicine. Currently it is preparing for the establishment of a research and training centre in precision medicine. ­There are also plans to establish a centre for contagious diseases in the future.

­The two state key laboratories, namely the State Key Laboratory of Analog and Mixed-Signal VLSI (AMS-VLSI Lab), and the State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine (QRCM Lab), are also located in the Research Building. ­The research conducted in these two state key laboratories has reached the highest professional standards in the respective fields. The QRCM Lab was the first state key laboratory in the field of Chinese medicine approved by the Ministry of Science and Technology. So far, staff from the laboratory have published over 600 influential academic papers. ­The research centre for innovative drugs based on traditional Chinese medicines, jointly established by Peking University, Taiwan University, the University of Hong Kong, and UM, is also located in the QRCM Lab. ­The chips designed by the AMS-VLSI Lab now enjoy a good international reputation and impact, especially in the field of low-power, high-performance analog-to-digital converters. UM now ranks No 2 in the world in terms of the number of papers published in the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits (JSSC) and at the IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC), ahead of many world-renowned universities and enterprises. ­The IEEE JSSC and the IEEE ISSCC are the most renowned in the field of integrated circuits and only accept results with successful measurements from fabricated silicon chips.

‘In 2015, one year after our state key lab moved to the new campus, our team achieved very good results,’ says Wei Jinchao, a doctoral student from the ICMS. ‘Our research output more than doubled that in 2013, the year we left the old campus.’

Prof Elvis Mak from the AMS-VLSI Lab says, ‘UM is as good as any first-rate overseas university, whether in terms of research ambience or research facilities. Many of our researchers have a nimble mind, creative ideas, and all the other qualities required for conducting high-quality scientific research. Over the past few years, our lab has progressed quickly. We have introduced chemical and biological technologies. We hope to build on what we have achieved in microelectronics and produce multidisciplinary research results with greater impact.


Great Professors

UM boasts a strong faculty team composed of internationally-recruited scholars who have gained international recognition for their academic and research achievements. Many of the faculty members are leaders in their areas of expertise, including Prof Wei Zhao and Prof Lionel Ni, both computer scientists and chief scientists for projects under the National 973 Programme; Prof Rui Martins, an expert on microelectronics; Prof Haydn Chen, an expert on materials science; Prof Philip Chen, an expert on intelligent computer systems; Prof Chuxia Deng, an expert on cancer research; and Prof Yang Yi, a leading authority in Chinese literary studies.

UM has also invited renowned experts and scholars in different fields to serve as masters of its residential colleges. ­These include Prof Liu Chuan Sheng, an authority on plasma physics; Prof Chung Ling, a renowned writer; Dr Peter Yu, an expert on comparative education and student a‑ airs; Prof David Pong, a veteran historian; Prof Yip Ming Chuen, an expert on the mechanics of materials; Prof De Bao Xu, a renowned linguist; Prof Kevin ­Thompson, a renowned musician; Prof Kenneth Leung, an expert on communication law and ethics; and Prof Iu Vai Pun, an expert on structural mechanics. Under the leadership of these masters, the colleges have established their own unique cultures.

In addition to recruiting masters in various fields, UM also regularly invites world-renowned scholars to give lectures on campus. Since 2014, more than ten recipients of the Nobel Prize, Turing Award, and Fields Medal have gaven lectures at UM to share the latest research trends and new discoveries. ­These guests have included Prof Chen-Ning Franklin Yang, Prof Mo Yan, Prof Shing-Tung Yau, Prof Mori Shigefumi, Prof Mario Capecchi, Prof Ada Yonath, Prof Aaron Ciechanover, Prof Carl Edwin Wieman, Prof Robert F Engle, and Prof Joseph E Stiglitz.

Wong Hang Heng is a postdoctoral research fellow who works with Prof Chuxia Deng. She chose to join UM because she knew Prof Deng to be a renowned expert on cancer research, and she hoped to join his team. ‘Over the past three years, I have learned a lot about cancer research, especially research on breast cancer,’ says Wong. ‘I have also learned a lot of valuable experience from Prof Deng, including how to develop my career.’

Fu Yinchang, a doctoral student of Chinese literature, studies with Prof Yang Yi, a leading authority on Chinese literary studies who is hailed as one of China’s best literary historians in the 21st century and one of the most creative and influential scholars in contemporary China. ‘What I have learned the most from Prof Yang are his meticulous attitude towards academic research and his way of thinking,’ says Fu. ‘He often tells me that nothing is difficult to the person with the right attitude. With the right attitude, one can accomplish anything.’


Great Knowledge and Great Character

In addition to ‘great buildings’ and ‘great professors’, UM has also established a new educational system. In 2014, UM began implementing a complete residential college system, which is also the largest such system in Asia, to complement the academic faculty system. ­ e university hopes that the residential colleges and faculties can combine to serve as the vehicles for implementing the ‘4-in-1’ education model, which consists of discipline-specific c education, general education, research and internship education, and community and peer education, so as to provide a multifaceted education to students. Apart from classroom instruction, faculty members also participate in student activities outside the classroom. As Rector Wei Zhao often says, ‘­ rough community and peer education implemented through the residential college system, we hope to help our students develop self-knowledge and self-confidence, because these are the source of creativity. We want our graduates to possess not only extensive knowledge (great knowledge) but also a noble mind and cultured behaviour (great character).

Rex Fung, a member of Chao Kuang Piu College, has been an active participant in campus activities over the past four years. ‘I have participated in various activities both inside and outside our residential college. They have broadened my horizons and helped me make new friends,’ he says. ‘­The college provides opportunities for us to spend time with other students so we can become closer to each other. Living in the college allows us to enjoy campus life more.’

Sophie Chen, a member of Moon Chun Memorial College, believes that the musical ambience in the college has improved her own taste in, and knowledge of, music. ‘Our college master Prof Kevin ­ Thompson is a world-class musician,’ says Chen. ‘He has fostered a very good musical ambience in the college, which taught me how to appreciate the beauty of music and other art forms, and I think this will in turn have a very positive influence on my character development.

Liu Hong Cheng, a member of Cheng Yu Tung College, says, ‘Our college attaches great importance to helping us cultivate a reading habit. We are encouraged to read literature to improve our appreciation of literary works. Literature can help foster great character traits, and when you have great character traits, you know how to better handle interpersonal relationships, which will benet those around you. It will also increase your interest in studies.

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<![CDATA[The Purpose of University Education]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/42207http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/42207Text: Rector Wei Zhao     Photo: Editorial Board

In an age when news of higher education is dominated by headlines of institutional rankings, it is perhaps a good time to pose the question: what is the purpose of university education?

Paradoxically, as technology ushers in a brave yet formidable new world, we see a new relevance in our old values, as educators face the challenge of preparing our students for an unpredictable future. Asian countries have an abiding faith in education, investing heavily in building ‘world-class’ universities. In doing so, they are chasing different models for academic excellence.

Cloning Presents Its Own Challenges

In many Asian countries, some have chosen to ‘clone’ the world’s leading universities. There is nothing wrong with copying the best. But borrowing wholesale presents its own challenges. Stanford University’s world-famous startup culture, for example, thrives because of its proximity to a venture capital community ready to bankroll innovative ideas. 

Harvard’s legendary president Charles Eliot was correct in saying that any great university is great in its own ways, and that any good university should grow from ‘seed’, and ‘not be a copy of foreign institutions’.

In mainland China’s case, its top universities are charged with the burden of revitalising its economy, as the age of low-tech export yields to the age of innovation. But is economic innovation just a matter of training technologically-savvy graduates? Economic miracles, you might have noticed, are o en performed by those with the courage for risk-taking. 

Rethink the Purpose of the Modern University

In the West, failure doesn’t stigmatise. Winston Churchill’s statement that ‘Success is stumbling from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm’ typifies this attitude. In thin-skinned Asia, we have a cultural fear of failure. Surprisingly, China is defying this tradition; its edge over its neighbours is in the ranks of self-believing risk-takers who power its economic great leap forward.

One such self-knowing risk-taker is Jack Ma. Mr Ma is no technology wizard. But what he lacks in technological knowledge, he more than makes up for in being able to sniff out opportunities and betting on his hunches. If he represents anything, he represents the success of serial failures: failing his College Entrance Examinations twice, being turned down for jobs multiple times, his business ventures succeeding only on the third try. He had the dubious distinction of being rejected by Harvard as many as ten times. 

Many in the West dismiss the Chinese as shameless copycats. But they fail to see that unique Chinese genius: the nose for opportunities, and the stomach for taking risks. They are bold, resilient leapfrog artists of the first order. 

At a time when the universities global rankings leaderboard is on the lips of the public, we decided to rethink the purpose of the modern university—by heeding the words of our sages.

Self-knowledge and Self-belief

We decided to aim at helping students to acquire self-knowledge and self-belief, realising that it is the fountainhead of creativity o en overlooked by modern universities. Helping people to acquire self-knowledge is not new. What is new, in our case, is building an ecosystem that realises the ideal, including an extensive residential college system that is friendly to the development of the self. Aristotle exhorted us to ‘Know thyself’. Laotzu, China’s o -quoted sage, reminded us that ‘Knowing others is wisdom. Knowing oneself is enlightenment.’ As a people-centred place, the university’s special mission is to bring out the best in students. But this attainment presupposes self-knowledge and self-belief.

At first blush, the age of innovation is incompatible with the ancient pursuit of self-knowledge. But we soon realise that while knowledge itself may become obsolete, self-knowledge is an ever-flowing stream of innovativeness. That is the renewed relevance of ancient wisdom.

In a world torn apart by conflict, ‘knowing thyself’ is also a moral imperative. The hallmark of the educated is tolerance—a willingness to embrace diversity and differences, whether in the Mid-East or closer to home. Those who know themselves are less prone to intolerance and needless conflict.

Help Students Know Themselves

As educators, we have a duty to see that students rst get to know themselves before they rush to change the world or judge others. The university’s domain is the future. Smart machines may threaten to displace humans from many occupations. But there is one area in which machines can never replace humans---the nurturing of individual talent. That is why creating conditions that promote creative talent through self-knowledge is a paramount concern. 

The ideal 21st century graduate has both broad and deep knowledge, with discipline-specific education, general education, research and internship education, and community and peer education. The first two are conventional learning, the last two are learning by doing. It is in doing that we discover our true worth in a competitive century. Universities, unlike businesses, cater to individuality, not to the standardisation of product the way MacDonald’s handles its hamburgers. The best way to future-proof the university is to future-proof our students by bracing them for risk-taking, shoving them out of the safety of the familiar.

As Shakespeare long ago realised, character is destiny. We are in the business of character-building, putting students in touch with themselves, embracing the wider world, while keeping them hungry for learning and risks. The age of technology should develop a new romance with ancient wisdom. It thrives on it, not in spite of it.

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<![CDATA[Artificial intelligence experts to discuss development of Big Bay Area at UM]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/42192http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/42192The University of Macau (UM) and the Macao Convention and Exhibition Association will co-organise a science promotion forum titled ‘Development of Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Big Bay Area in the Era of Artificial Intelligence’ on Monday 3 July. Three world-renowned experts in the field will attend the forum to discuss cutting-edge artificial intelligence technologies and strategies for promoting the development of the Big Bay Area. The forum will be held in Room E4-G078, Anthony Lau Building, UM. It will begin at 3:00pm and be conducted in Mandarin, with simultaneous interpretation into English. Those who are interested please register at https://isw.umac.mo/evm/register/AI_Forum. For enquiries, please call 8822 4504. 

For the full version, please refer to the Chinese version.


Source: Communications Office

Media Contact Information:
Communications Office, University of Macau

Albee Lei  Tel:(853) 88228004
Kelvin U  Tel:(853) 88224322
Email:prs.media@umac.mo
UM Website:www.umac.mo

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<![CDATA[UM-developed system to help visually impaired bus riders wins championship at IEEE international contest]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/42195http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/42195A team from the University of Macau (UM) recently won the championship at the IEEE Mega-Challenge 2017: Smart Cities Competition, which was part of the IEEE RFID 2017 Conference, for their project ‘UHF RFID Based Gesture Control System for Smart City Transportation’. The system uses radio frequency identification to help visually impaired people communicate with the bus station via simple gesture control.

The competition was organised by the IEEE Council on Radio Frequency Identification, the largest academic institution on radio frequency identification. The theme of the competition was applications and innovations of RFID techniques in smart cities. The competition recruited proposals and contestants from all over the world. Four teams were selected to advance to the final held in Phoenix, United States. The system developed by the UM team uses radio frequency identification to help visually impaired people communicate with the bus station via simple gesture control. Led by Prof Tam Kam-Weng and Dr Lao Keng-Weng from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, the UM team consisted of Zhang Wenhai, a doctoral student from the same department; and Lou Wan-Ian, a student from Scared Heart Canossian College (English Section) who received training in the department.

The proposal is the first one in the world that analyses the relationship between the energy absorption of an antenna and the passive RFID tags. It proposes the nonlinear energy absorption phenomenon of the RFID tags in vertical and horizontal positions. In an extension of the findings, the UM team proposed installing the system in the canes used by visually impaired people to allow them to operate the system with simple gestures (horizontal or vertical). During the competition, contestants were required to present their proposals to experts within a specified time frame and answer questions from the experts. Through several rounds of competitions, the presentation and proposal made by the UM team received unanimous praise from the judges and won the championship.

The teams from the United States, mainland China, and Australia were the first runner-up, second runner-up, and third runner-up, respectively. The UM team was invited to present their proposal in the poster section of the IEEE RFID 2017 Conference. The proposal will also be included in the conference proceedings.     

Lou Wan-Ian, the only middle school student from the UM team, was the champion of an innovation concept competition held earlier under a talent development programme co-organised by UM’s Science Promotion Center and the Macao Science and Technology Development Fund. Because of her excellent performance, she was invited to join the UM team at the competition.


Source: Faculty of Science and Technology

Media Contact Information:
Communications Office, University of Macau

Albee Lei  Tel:(853) 88228004
Kelvin U  Tel:(853) 88224322
Email:prs.media@umac.mo

UM Website:www.umac.mo

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<![CDATA[Across Golden Bridge: Forum on Traditional Chinese Philosophy and the Development of Contemporary Culture]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/42178http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/42178Convite à Imprensa
Nome : Across Golden Bridge: Forum on Traditional Chinese Philosophy and the Development of Contemporary Culture
Organizer : Centre for Chinese History and Culture, University of Macau; Global Chinese Union; China Cultural Media Group
Data : 27 June 2017 (Tuesday)
Horário : 10:00am
Venue : E4-G078, Anthony Lau Building, Mr. and Mrs. Lau Chor Tak Lecture Theatre
Conteúdo : With the themes “Traditional philosophy and the development of contemporary culture” and “Traditional philosophy drives the development of traditional Chinese culture,” the forum has invited well-known scholars from mainland China and Macao to discuss the essence of traditional Chinese culture with Macao residents to increase their understanding of the subject.
Language : Mandarin

Pessoa a Contactar para Detalhes

Nome : Communications Office
Tel. Nº : 88228022
Fax : 88222359
Email : prs.media@umac.mo
Remark : For car parking reservation, please contact us one day in advance.
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<![CDATA[Building a Better Macao Through Talent Development—Long-term Strategy Yields Initial Results]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/42184http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/42184<![CDATA[UM members go on cultural trip to Dunhuang]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/42175http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/4217518 students from Lui Che Woo College and Moon Chun Memorial College of the University of Macau (UM) recently went on a cultural trip to Dunhuang, Gansu province, to learn more about the history and culture along the Silk Road. Led by resident fellows Dr Chu Caixia and Dr Ray Cheung, the students visited the Mogao Caves, Jiayuguan Great Wall, Arou Temple, and Qinghai Lake. At Qinghai Lake, students cleaned up the shore as a gesture of their commitment to environmental protection.  


For the full version, please refer to the Chinese version.



Source: Lui Che Woo College and Moon Chun Memorial College


Media Contact Information:

Communications Office, University of Macau


Albee Lei  Tel:(853) 88228004

Kelvin U  Tel:(853) 88224322

Email:prs.media@umac.mo

UM Website:www.umac.mo

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<![CDATA[UM graduates first doctor from Spanish-speaking country]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/42176http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/42176Gilberto Ortiz, a Colombian doctoral student of civil and earthquake engineering from the University of Macau (UM) Faculty of Science and Technology (FST), recently passed his doctoral dissertation oral defense and became the first doctor from a Spanish-speaking country to graduate from UM. Ortiz believes that the academic journey of each student is different and good supervisors play a crucial role in helping students achieve their full potential. 

In his dissertation, Ortiz proposed a novel Bayesian nonparametric technique that has a wide range of applications, such as predicting the peak ground acceleration (PGA), modelling of seismic attenuation, and structural health monitoring. Ortiz’s supervisor was Prof Yuen Ka Veng, the registrar of UM and a professor from the FST, who specialises in real-time structural health monitoring system for large infrastructure and buildings. Ortiz attributes his repeated breakthroughs in research to the guidance of Prof Yuen.   

After completing his master’s studies in Colombia several years ago, Ortiz decided to pursue a doctoral degree, with focus on the application of Bayesian inference methods in civil engineering problems. It was then that the name of Prof Yuen came to his mind. ‘Prof Yuen is a well-known expert in the field and has published many books and research papers on the subject I am working on. His publications are my main source of information,’ says Ortiz. ‘So I summoned up my courage and contacted him. I expressed my interest in doing a PhD under his supervision. Fortunately, Prof Yuen was looking for two PhD students at that time and I was selected to fill in one of the positions.’

Each postgraduate supervisor from UM upholds a high standard of ethical and professional conduct. Ortiz appreciates the expert guidance and support provided by Prof Yuen, which enabled him to carry out his research and present his results to the best advantage. ‘Prof Yuen was always ready to provide guidance and give clear directions for my work. His expertise on Bayesian inference, his clear understanding of the theory, and his constructive criticism were a great source of inspiration,’ says Ortiz. ‘Also, he often challenged my opinions, which I really valued, because it taught me how to defend my ideas and helped me to grow intellectually.’



Source: Communications Office

Media Contact Information:
Communications Office, University of Macau

Albee Lei  Tel:(853) 88228004
Kelvin U  Tel:(853) 88224322
Email:prs.media@umac.mo
UM Website:www.umac.mo

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<![CDATA[Condecoração do Prof. Dr. Kevin Thompson a Cavaleiro da Ordem Nacional da Legião de Mérito, a mais alta Ordem de Mérito francesa]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/42162http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/42162A 10 de Maio de 2017, o Presidente da República Francesa, o recém-eleito Presidente Emmanuel Macron, por decreto-lei decidira conferir ao Professor Doutor Kevin Thompson o título e a ofício de Cavaleiro da Ordem Nacional da Legião de Honra (Chevalier de l'Ordre National de la Légion d’honneur),

Fundada por Napoleão Bonaparte em 1802, a Légion d’honneur é a mais alta Ordem de Mérito francesa e uma das mais cobiçadas.

Em 2012, o Prof. Doutor Thompson, Mestre pela Universidade de Macau (UM) Moon Chun Memorial College (MCMC) fora condecorado Cavaleiro Oficial da Ordem das Artes e Letras (Officier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres) por Frédéric Mitterrand.

A Legião de Honra (Légion d’honneur) é conferida a indivíduos com “méritos excepcionais prestados à República Francesa enquanto civis ou militares”.

Entre os antigos condecorados da Legião de Honra (Légion d’honneur) lembremos: o tenor Plácido Domingo; os escritores Graham Greene e JK Rowling; a actriz Kristin Scott Thomas; o realizador Wong Kar-Wai; e os prémios Nobel: Ang San Suu Kyi, Joseph Stiglitz, e Seamus Heaney.


Origem de notícias: Moon Chun Memorial College

Contacto com média:
Departamento de Comunicação da Universidade de Macau

Tel: (853) 88228004
Tel: (853) 88224322
E-mail: prs.media@umac.mo
Página principal da Universidade de Macau: www.umac.mo

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