UM News http://www.umac.mo/ $title pt_pt hourly 1<![CDATA[UM’s Chinese medicine researchers shine again at Challenge Cup]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43832http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43832Two teams formed by postgraduate students from the University of Macau’s (UM) Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences (ICMS), received a second prize and a third prize, respectively, at the Challenge Cup, a national competition in extracurricular high-tech projects for college students.

Held at Shanghai University, the competition attracted 1,230 entries from mainland China, Hong Kong, Macao, and Taiwan. One of the UM teams, led by Assistant Professor Wang Chunming, received a second prize for a new type of wound dressing they developed from Chinese medicines that can effectively heal stubborn wounds. The other UM team, led by ICMS Director Wang Yitao and Wang Shengpeng, received a third prize for a new type of sun spray with Chinese medicines as its main ingredients.  

Since its founding in 2003, the ICMS has achieved impressive results in producing innovative graduates, as reflected in the number of prizes its students have received at the Challenge Cup over the past 15 years, including first prizes (four times), second prizes (six times), and third prizes (five times). The institute’s success is inextricably linked to its policy to train innovative researchers and to promote collaboration with the industry for technology transfer. The per capita number of papers published by ICMS members in SCI-indexed journals as principal investigators was 8.6 in 2016, with each paper’s average citation frequency exceeding 12.

The Challenge Cup is a national science and technology competition in China. It is hailed as the ‘Olympics’ in technological innovation among Chinese university students. The competition is hosted by well-known mainland universities and jointly organised by the Central Committee of the Young Communist League, the Chinese Association for Science and Technology, the Ministry of Education, the All-China Students’ Federation, and provincial governments. 


Source: Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences

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<![CDATA[From a Brickmaker to a World¡Vclass Scientist Interview with Concrete Expert Prof Li Zongjin]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43834http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43834Source: umagazine

Building the tallest structures, the saying goes, begins with the base. To Prof Li Zongjin, chair professor at the University of Macau's (UM) Institute of Applied Physics and Materials Engineering (IAPME) and winner earlier this year of the Arthur R Anderson Medal from the American Concrete Institute, the base is basically composed of an important material—concrete.

The Arthur R Anderson Medal recognizes Prof Li for his triple global contributions to infrastructure, teaching, and research. The first Chinese scientist to be so honoured since the award was established 45 years ago, this preeminent concrete expert is admired by peers and inspires the younger generation. His humble beginnings saw him toil as a brickmaker and farm hand. How did he then reinvent himself to become a world-class scientist? The ‘secret’ to his success is simple yet prosaic: ‘I merely work when other people are drinking coffee.’

When Li was in middle school, a cataclysmic event turned China upside down and upended millions of lives across the country. That defining event is the Cultural Revolution. His formal education ended prematurely, Li was forced to fend for himself; he was first thrust for two and a half years into a demanding job as a farmer, and then moved into a brickmaking factory that belonged to an iron mine. But somehow, he turned this adversity into advantage; it marked the beginning of his self-education. Li was inspired by China's iconic writer Lu Xun, who, when told he was a genius, famously replied, ‘There is no such thing as a genius. I merely work when others are drinking coffee’. He devoted all his precious hours after a gruelling day's work in the mine to reading borrowed books, while his co-workers busied themselves playing poker. ‘If you aspire to achievement, you must work harder than others. Only then can you seize the opportunities when they present themselves,’ he says.

An opportunity eventually came knocking, and seize it he did. In 1977, the National College Entrance Exam was reinstated in China. Having never stopped his self-education during the wilderness years, Li now had a clear, reachable goal in mind—entering college and making up for lost time. During those difficult years, he developed the habit of collecting and internalising famous sayings by famous people. When he received a life-changing offer from Zhejiang University the following year, he was moved to quote one of his favourite aphorisms: ‘Hard work makes a beautiful life possible.’

 

Foreseeing the Potential in Concrete Research

The hardships Li endured in his youth cultivated his perseverance and resilience. Whether at Zhejiang University or Northwestern University in the United States, Li was always the most hardworking student. During those days, he made an important discovery that would later shape his career trajectory. He noticed that concrete was the most widely-used building material in the world, and yet nobody seemed to realise the importance of research in the field. ‘The per capita consumption of concrete is at least 2,500 to 3,000 kilograms a year worldwide, which is more than the per capital annual consumption of grains,’ he says. ‘But because concrete is easy to get, it is rarely treated with the importance it deserves.’ Foreseeing great potential in concrete research, Li began to study ways to improve the performance of concrete at a lower cost. According to Li, scientists have a far better understanding of metal materials than concrete, because concrete is a composite material that is structurally more complicated than metals.

In 2009, Li was appointed by the Ministry of Science and Technology of China as the sole chief scientist for a concrete research project under the national 973 programme. He was given a challenging task: developing a modern version of concrete that is environmentally friendly but also more flexible and durable.

He and his team rose to the challenge and successfully developed a new technology, which has been used in numerous construction projects in China, including the high speed railway track between Beijing and Shanghai, Tianwan Nuclear Power Plant, and the Taizhou and Chongqi Bridges.

Having devoted half his life to concrete research, Prof Li says that one distinguishing feature of concrete is the great variance in the scale of measurement. ‘To understand the structure of steel or iron, normally all you have to do is observe the atomic structure, but when it comes to concrete, the variance in the scale of measurement is so great. We are talking about ten to the 14th power, from observing the products from concrete hydration using nano technology to monitoring bridges of several kilometres,’ he says. ‘By understanding products generated from concrete hydration using nano science, we can improve the micro-structure of concrete by artificially adding organic or inorganic nano-particles to make their macro-performance comply with our requirements, such as increasing a structure’s flexural strength or toughness.’

Currently, Prof Li is working with assistant professor Sun Guoxing from the IAPME and they have achieved some encouraging results. For example, by adding 5-nm inorganic particles in organic hydrogels, they successfully developed hydrogels with the best all-round performance in the world. Also, by adding organic or inorganic particles in concrete, they successfully increased the flexural strength of concrete by three times without lowering the compressive strength.

 

Cross-disciplinary Collaboration

Prof Li credits his accomplishments in concrete research to the guidance of Prof S P Shah, his master’s and PhD supervisor while he was studying at Northwestern University in the US. Prof Shah opened Li’s eyes to what could be achieved with cross-disciplinary collaboration. ‘When I was in the US, I noticed that students involved in concrete research were not just from the civil engineering department; some of them also came from other departments, such as chemistry, physics, and materials engineering,’ he says. ‘Having members from different backgrounds could help the team approach the subject of research from different angles, with different kinds of expertise. Later, when I was trying to establish my own team, I adopted this cross-disciplinary approach.’

Li also adopts the cross-disciplinary approach when recruiting students. ‘We would look at the overlaps between different disciplines,’ he says. ‘We used to say that the inside knowledge of a discipline is like Greek to outsiders. But now we try to bring people from different disciplines together so they can exchange ideas based on their own expertise, and the results have been very good.’ He cites an example to illustrate his point. Earlier, his team needed to develop a piece of software to better control the experiment equipment, which would have been very difficult for civil engineering students. But with the help of students from the electronic engineering department, they developed the software in a very short time, which expedited the progress of the research study with good results. ‘ If we only study concrete from the perspective of civil engineering or materials engineering, we would be limiting the applications of concrete. Cross-disciplinary collaboration, on the other hand, opens our mind and lets us see all kinds of possibilities,’ he says.

 

Seeing Opportunities at UM

Prof Li has worked at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) for 22 years. Formerly the associate dean of the School of Engineering at HKUST, he is currently a chair professor in the IAPME at UM. ‘UM’s rapid progress in recent years has attracted experts and scholars from around the world, which is similar to what happened to HKUST when I first joined it. So I saw the great potential of UM, and decided to come here.’

 

Developing a New Type of Wind Turbines

Currently, Prof Li is working on a cross-disciplinary research project: a new type of wind turbine which he hopes can be set up on the UM campus. ‘Macao is blessed with excellent wind resources, and I hope to take full advantage of the resources to develop a new type of wind turbine for the new campus,’ he says. His team is working to develop a 1000-watt floating wind turbine, with a blade-to-blade distance of 3.2 metres. Unlike the old-fashioned tower-based wind turbines, the floating wind turbine was designed based on the Archimedes Law, with the buoyancy of the liquid supporting the vertical load of the wind turbine. To put it simply, it is like placing the wind turbine on the surface of the water to reduce the resistance from the turning of the blades as well as the wear and tear of the parts. What’s more, the blades can be made from concrete.

If successful, the wind turbine will be able to generate between 4,000 and 5,000 kilowatt hours of electricity every year, enough to satisfy the need of a small office. Speaking of future research plans, Prof Li says excitedly, ‘We hope to attract investments from businesses and give our students an opportunity to deepen their research and develop a large-sized wind turbine that can generate more power.’

 

Contributing to the Development of a Smart City with New Research

To support the Macao SAR government’s goal to develop Macao into a smart city, UM is preparing for the establishment of a third state key laboratory for big data research. Prof Li is part of the team. He and his colleagues are now studying the application of cement-based piezoelectric sensors in traffic control. ‘It is similar to the touchscreen of a mobile phone,’ he says. ‘The idea is that when a vehicle passes through a road installed with cement-based piezoelectric sensors, it would generate electric charges on the surface of the sensors. By collecting the data, we could calculate the traffic flow, vehicle speed, and vehicle weight. If we consolidate these data and establish an internet of things, we would be able to realize real-time traffic monitoring, thus contributing to creating a smart city in Macao.’

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<![CDATA[UM holds international conference on EU’s future]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43836http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43836An international conference titled, ‘60 Years after the Treaties of Rome: What is the Future for the European Union?’, opened at the University of Macau (UM), as an event under the European Union Academic Programme-Macau (EUAP-Macau). The conference was organised by UM’s Faculty of Law and received support from the Legal Affairs Bureau of the Macao SAR.

The conference aims to provide a better understanding of the European Union, including its laws and international relations with its partners in the Asia-Pacific region, particularly in mainland China and Macao. The conference offers the most recent knowledge on the legal problems related to the topics listed in the programme. The conference also recognises UM as a university of excellence with a competitive edge in the field.

Officiating guests at the opening ceremony included Rui Martins, vice rector (research) of UM and chair of the Executive Committee of EUAP-Macau; Prof Augusto Teixeira Garcia, associate dean of the FLL and representative of FLL Dean Tong Io Cheng; Ambassador Carmen Cano, head of the European Union Office for Hong Kong and Macau; Dr Carmen Maria Chung, deputy director of the Legal Affairs Bureau of Macao SAR; Dr José Luís de Sales Marques, president of the Institute of European Studies of Macau; Dr Rui Cunha, president of Fundação Rui Cunha, Macao; and Prof Tu Guangjian, director of the Institute for Advanced Legal Studies, FLL, UM.

The event attracted more than 30 speakers from 16 jurisdictions. Most of them are well-known scholars and experts in their respective fields. During the conference, they will discuss international issues related to the EU, and those of major interest to Macao, from a predominantly legal perspective. The conference will be focused on the EU’s international relations, especially those with the Asia-Pacific region.

UM and the European Studies Institute of Macao in 2012 jointly established the EUAP-Macau, in cooperation with prestigious European academic institutions, including the University of Coimbra in Portugal and Maastricht University in the Netherlands. Co-financed by the EU, the EUAP-Macau aims to provide a platform for teaching, research, and the dissemination of news and events related to the EU. 


Source: Faculty of Law

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<![CDATA[UNCITRAL-UM Joint Conference 2017 opens today]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43828http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43828The UNCITRAL-UM Joint Conference 2017 titled ‘Modernisation of National Commercial Laws and the Role of Harmonisation of Laws in International Trade and Commerce’ opened today (11 December) in the World Trade Center Macau.

The opening ceremony of the conference was attended by dignitaries representing the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL), Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste, World Trade Center Macau Arbitration Center, Macau Lawyers Association, the Macao SAR government, and the University of Macau (UM).

During the two-day conference, experts and scholars will discuss contemporary and international legal issues arising out of various UNCITRAL texts and related harmonisation of law today and tomorrow. During the opening ceremony, UM’s Acting Rector Rui Martins pointed out how the continued cooperation between UNCITRAL and UM in the past several years has resulted in the organisation of a series of joint conferences and highlighted its significance. He said that the collaboration has reached new heights in 2017 with the organisation of a new International Legal Symposium on Promoting Economic and Trade Cooperation between China and Lusophone Countries in Macao SAR scheduled for 13 December, with the support of four other key institutions in the region. José Angelo Estrella Faria, senior legal officer and head of the Technical Assistance Section International Trade Law Division, Office of Legal Affairs, United Nations, delivered a keynote speech titled ‘International Legal Harmonisation as Tool for Modernising Commercial Law’.

This is the fourth conference resulting from the collaboration between UM and the UNCITRAL Regional Center for Asia and the Pacific. This year’s conference also received support from the World Trade Center Macau. Experts and scholars from around the world, including Australia, Bangladesh, Switzerland, Hungary, Japan, India, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, Mozambique, Angola, the United Kingdom, mainland China, Hong Kong, and Macao will address the conference in six sessions over the next two days. Participants will discuss a wide range of contemporary legal developments in international trade and commercial law, with focus on the specific themes. The proceedings of the conference will be published after the conference.

Guests attending the opening ceremony included Dr Maria Ângela Guterres Viegas Carrascalão, minister of justice of the Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste; Dr Alberto E Marçal, vice president of the World Trade Center Macau Arbitration Center; Dr Jorge Neto Valente, president of the Macau Lawyers Association; Dr Ilda Cristina Fernandes de Sousa Ferreira, head of the Department of International Law and Inter-Regional Law, Legal Affairs Bureau of the Macao SAR; and Prof Tong Io Cheng, dean of the Faculty of Law, UM.


Source: Faculty of Law

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<![CDATA[Macao International Legal Symposium on Promoting Economic and Trade Cooperation between China and Lusophone Countries]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43829http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43829Convite à Imprensa
Nome : Macao International Legal Symposium on Promoting Economic and Trade Cooperation between China and Lusophone Countries
Organizer : Faculty of Law, University of Macau, Legal Affairs Bureau, Forum for Economic and Trade Co-operation between China and Portuguese-speaking Countries, UNCITRAL, World Trade Centre Macau and the Macau Lawyers Association
Data : 13 December 2017 (Wednesday)
Horário : 9:00am
Venue : Lotus Room, 5th Floor, World Trade Center Macau
Conteúdo : The themes of this Symposium are: “Macao as a Centre for Arbitration to Resolve Economic and Trade Disputes between China and Lusophone Countries”, “Legal Harmonisation and the Role of Macao in the Context of China-Lusophone Cooperation and the ‘Belt and Road’ initiative”, “Promoting Business Opportunities and Legal Services in the Context of China-Lusophone Cooperation and the ‘Belt and Road’ initiative”, with its aims of providing a mutual platform for legal experts, professionals and scholars from China, Lusophone Countries and Macao to share their knowledge on arbitration, legal harmonisation and the promotion of business opportunities and legal services under the “Belt and Road” initiative.
Language : Cantonese , Portuguese

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<![CDATA[UM students win second prize at Composite Battle World Cup]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43816http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43816A team of PhD students from the University of Macau (UM) Institute of Applied Physics and Materials Engineering recently won a second prize in the academic report category at the Composite Battle World Cup. Held in Northwestern Polytechnical University in Xi’an, the competition attracted 16 teams from China, Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Australia, Egypt, and Myanmar. Eight of them come from Chinese universities, namely Tsinghua University, Beihang University, Harbin Institute of Technology, Tongji University, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Harbin Engineering University, Northwestern Polytechnical University, and UM.


Source: Institute of Applied Physics and Materials Engineering

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<![CDATA[Galleries of Time — honoured Voices]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43818http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43818umagazine

History is a fascinating enterprise which aims to sustain the widest possible interpretation of memory. ‘The Galleries: Sources, Voices and Histories’ – a permanent exhibition in the hallways of the Department of History, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Macau (UM) – not only invites visitors to stroll through time, but also demonstrates how to understand and interpret voices that transcend time. This collaborative project, under the aegis of the Subcommittee on Education and Research, UNESCO Memory of the World Programme, aims to cultivate the greatest gift in students – curiosity.


Pioneering Dynamic Exhibition

Adopting cutting-edge and multi-perspective ways of presenting history and culture, The Galleries is a pioneer project that makes use of long hallways to allow visitors to savour the tranquillity of its well-embellished surrounding, whilst exploring the dynamic and diverse portfolio of historical research produced at UM. The exhibition presents findings from source-based research studies of the history of China, East-West interactions, and Southeast Asia and Maritime history, in chronological order, with an emphasis on the pragmatic usefulness of historical knowledge that goes beyond esoteric academic purposes.

The Galleries showcases various exciting journeys of detectives of time, who hunt through archival records and archaeological artefacts, seeking clues that might help construct a vivid picture of something which happened long ago. ¡¥Not only does it empower public connection with the past of our home city, The Galleries also introduces our students to the enthralling world of research on history in a wide range of perspectives, meanwhile making them realise the fact that solid outcomes could be only achieved through diligent efforts,¡¦ says Prof Wang Di, head of the Department of History.

‘This project shows how we [faculty members] conduct evidence-based research intertwined with thought-provoking queries and interrogatory skills,’ says Prof Wang. ‘And in some ways, it tells our students that it is of great importance to look at historical data in a critical manner so as to reconstruct a sound interpretation of ever-changing human cultures, politics, lifestyles, beliefs, and creativity.’

 

Distinct Scholarly Exploration

The Galleries is only possible because of the department’s impressive human capital – the carefully-selected and globally-connected group of renowned, competitive and innovative senior and junior scholars from mainland China, the United States, and Europe. Their multi-lingual competence and distinct academic vision enables the team to undertake source-based research in Chinese, Japanese, Manchu, Latin, Portuguese, Spanish, Italian, French, English, Dutch and German.

‘The Galleries aims to transmit to our students the double role of a historian – scholar and artisan, who need to master multilingual and interdisciplinary skills to analyse archival materials,’ says Dr Beatriz Puente-Ballesteros, an assistant professor of the Department of History, a corresponding member of the UNESCO’s Subcommittee on Education and Research, and the designer and coordinator of The Galleries. ‘This exhibition explains that it is only by means of painstaking source-based research that historians can open new horizons of theoretical exploration that define, concretise and contextualise the extent of contacts on both sides of inter-civilisational encounters, but also give voices to marginal and marginalized actors,’ she says.

Based on these approaches, The Galleries narrates differentiated histories of China from the past to the present, with a special focus on East-West interactions: Macao studies; maritime history in the Age of Sail; the history of science, technology, medicine, maps and art; and the history of South and Southeast Asia.

 

Renaissance Wonder-Room

Strolling through the hallways, one is reminded of the spatial arrangement of museums, where intriguing exhibits allow one to travel through time and space. According to Dr Puente-Ballesteros, the design of the exhibition’s conceptual dimension is inspired by the Renaissance Kunstkammern , which literally means ‘art rooms’, but are also known as ‘cabinets of curiosities’ or ‘wonder-rooms’. ‘Those “wonder-rooms” were conceived as a universe in microcosm in which the collector displayed his broad humanist learning by showing an encyclopaedic collection of objects mostly comprised of naturalia (products of nature), arteficialia (or artefacta , products of man), and scientifica (testaments of man’s ability to dominate nature),’ she says.

Playing around with these display concepts, Dr Puente-Ballesteros constructed a space of thematic and aesthetic encounters between China and the West, visually articulating the manifold activities carried out in source-based research from the Department. The formerly empty white walls of the long hallways functioned much like an empty canvas, on which professors could showcase their own Kunstkammer with objects and images related to their own research projects. The Galleries creates an inspiring promenade, displaying over 300 reproductions of images from archives and libraries all over the world, with information about the historical sources, including manuscripts of letters, archival documents, printed records, maps, drawings, illustrations, portraits, photographs, and posters.

 

Contributions from Students

The Galleries would not be complete without contributions from students. Thus, a prominent corner of The Galleries is reserved as ‘The History Students’ Space’ to inspire and motivate MA students and PhD candidates from the department to introduce their own research projects to other students' and the general public. The theme varies from time to time, depending on the students specific projects. ‘This Space allows our students to examine thoroughly the history they are interested in, consolidate and analyse the collected data, and demonstrate their skills in laying out their research findings in an intriguing manner,’ says Dr Puente-Ballesteros. ‘I always say to my students that sources are the voices of history and therefore we must honour them by using rigorous interpretation and sophisticated methodological approaches from comparative, transcultural and global perspectives’.

An inspiring panel entitled ‘Beautiful Adverts: Cigarettes, Drugs and Wines’ by Deng Yingxin and Xue Hui, two graduate students from the department, offers their own explanation of how the Western conception of gender roles greatly influenced Chinese advertisements in the 1950s and 1960s, and how consumer culture shaped Chinese modernity. A substantial number of advertising posters and paintings of the time are collected and displayed as eloquent evidence, offering guests a glimpse of how Western advertising tactics conquered Chinese markets and marked the beginning of modern China. ‘We brought a lot of time-honoured advertising graphics that witness the aesthetics of Chinese consumers of the time,’ says Deng. ‘These posters were influenced by Western advertisements and were successful in advertising and giving recognition to the artists. From these commercial posters, you might see lots of portrayals of elegant young ladies dressed in cheongsam, sitting on a sofa, which were exceptionally popular and in some way reflected the social status of Chinese women at that time,’ Xue says

The involvement of students in organising The Galleries not only fosters a commitment to learning but also prepares them to be critical and well-informed global citizens. 'These kaleidoscopic insights from my professors increased my curiosity,' says Sheng Jia, a second-year history major, who contributed to the panels including 'Macau: A Crossroad between East and West' by Prof Tang Kaijian, and ‘The Collapse of the Heavenly Dynasty’ and ‘the Construction of Modern China’ by Mao Haijian. For instance, a painting from View of

Macau in China by Gaspard Duche de Vancy (1756 - 1788) always impresses Sheng. ‘Just take a closer look at the harbour in this painting - just a few small fishing boats berthed there. Then we compare it with the “thirteen factories” (Shisanhang) in Guangzhou during the same time period, where many vessels crowded there for trade. We could see that Macao was no longer a vibrant trading port from the mid-18th century onward, and there’s a lot more to tell [from the picture],’ she says. ‘There could be connections or contradictions when we put sources together. Analysing them systemically has been a big challenge,’ says Sheng. ‘In some ways, that’s how we verify the narratives and offer more ways of interpreting history.’

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<![CDATA[UNCITRAL-UM Joint Conference ‘Modernisation of National Commercial Laws and the Role of Legal Harmonisation in International Commerce’]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43820http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43820Convite à Imprensa
Nome : UNCITRAL-UM Joint Conference ‘Modernisation of National Commercial Laws and the Role of Legal Harmonisation in International Commerce’
Organizer : Faculty of Law, University of Macau, UNCITRAL
Data : 11 December 2017 (Monday)
Horário : 9:00am
Venue : Lotus Room, 5th Floor, World Trade Center Macau
Conteúdo : During the conference, approximately 40 experts and scholars from Australia, the United Kingdom, Hungary, Japan, Singapore, India, Bangladesh, mainland China, Hong Kong, and Macao will discuss various contemporary and emerging issues in the areas of international trade law and commercial law.
Language : English

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<![CDATA[“Europe and China/Asia at the Crossroads: New Leadership, Big Challenges, and the Future of Global Order” Workshop]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43821http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43821Convite à Imprensa
Nome : “Europe and China/Asia at the Crossroads: New Leadership, Big Challenges, and the Future of Global Order” Workshop
Organizer : Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Macau and Institute of European Studies of Macau
Data : 11 December 2017 (Monday)
Horário : 10:30am
Venue : Room G078, Anthony Lau Building (E4), University of Macau
Conteúdo : This workshop would bring together scholars from Asia and Europe in various fields of international relations, security studies, international political economy, international development, and global governance, among others. As these new and unprecedented trends and challenges are unfolding forcefully, it is highly desirable to do meaningful scholarly study and reflection on their impacts on Asia, Europe, and the prospects of global order.
UM_Map_to E4.jpg
Language : English

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<![CDATA[UM students win 4th straight championship at paper plane contest]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43804http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/pt-pt/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43804Students from the Department of Electromechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology (FST), University of Macau (UM), led by Senior Instructor Lao Seng Kin, recently won the top three prizes in both the group category and the individual category, in the university section of a paper plane contest. This is the fourth consecutive year that UM students have won the championship at this competition.

The contest was organised by the Macao Innovation & Invention Association (MIIA). More than 300 students from 34 higher education institutions and high schools in mainland China, Hong Kong, Macao, and Taiwan participated in the contest.

At the longest airtime (group) contest, the FST Team A, formed by Ma Ieng, Lao Chi Fai, and Chan Ngai Hang, won the first prize; the Shiu Pong College Team, formed by Lei Hin Chon, U Kin Lok, and Wu Chon Neng, won a second prize; and the FST Team B, formed by Sio Pak Lok, Iong Sam I, and Tang Choi I, won a third prize. Additionally, the FST Team A also won a second prize at the longest distance (group) contest.

At the longest airtime (individual) contest, Lei Hin Chon won the first prize and broke Macao’s record at the competition by keeping his paper plane in the air for 16.27 seconds. Chan Ngai Hang and Lao Chi Fai won second and third prizes, respectively.


Source: Faculty of Science and Technology

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