UM News http://www.umac.mo/ $title en_us hourly 1<![CDATA[Chinese medicine forum held at UM]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43328http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43328The 2017 Chinese Medicine Forum was held at the University of Macau (UM) on 14 October. The theme of this year’s forum was ‘innovation-driven development’. Well-known experts, scholars, and industry practitioners attended the forum to discuss collaboration in innovation of Chinese medicines. This year marked the 15th anniversary of UM’s Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences (ICMS), more than 100 UM alumni working in the Chinese medicine industry also attended the forum.

Tse Chi Wai, president of the International Society for Chinese Medicine (ISCM); Lionel Ni, acting rector of UM; and Zhong Yi, vice president of Macao Foundation said in their speeches that both the central and SAR governments have high hopes for the innovation of Chinese medicines, and the Macao Foundation and UM will continue to provide support for research in the area. They expressed hope that participants would increase collaboration with UM scholars in the innovation of Chinese medicines.

Wang Yitao, director of the ICMS, gave a keynote speech, in which he reported the research achievements of the Chinese medicine team at UM, as well as the team’s effort to support the SAR government’s policy to give priority to the Chinese medicine industry.

Other experts who gave keynote speeches at the forum included Prof Li Yingbo from Peking University, Prof Yang Fengqing from Chongqing University, research fellow Li Xiwen from the Chinese Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, senior engineer Qin Ningyi from Jiangsu Hengrui Medicine Co. Ltd, R&D Manager Yu Zhong from Huapont Pharm, and assistant professor Wang Chunming from UM.

After the forum, participants visited the state key laboratory in Chinese medicine and highly praised the research progress of the lab. The forum was organised by the ISCM, co-hosted by UM’s ICMS and state key lab in Chinese medicine, and sponsored by the Macao Foundation, and the Science and Technology Development Fund. 


Source:  Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences

Media Contact Information:
Communications Office, University of Macau

Albee Lei  Tel:(853) 88228004
Kelvin U  Tel:(853) 88224322
Email:prs.media@umac.mo

UM Website:www.umac.mo 

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<![CDATA[UM to hold Innovation Week]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43330http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43330The University of Macau’s (UM) Institute of Collaborative Innovation will hold the UM Innovation Week 2017 from 30 October to 3 November, to provide an opportunity for faculty and students as well as the public to learn more about the culture of innovation and research achievements at UM. A series of fun activities will be held during the week, including exhibitions of research achievements and projects, the Venture Capital Day for Medical and Health Sciences, and talks on innovation and entrepreneurship.

The opening ceremony for the Innovation Week will be held on 1 November, at 2:00pm, in Room G018, on the ground floor of the UM Guesthouse. A ceremony for the signing of a memorandum of understanding on collaborative innovation will be held on the same day. In addition, venture capital investment experts will attend the event to exchange ideas with faculty members from UM’s Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences and Faculty of Health Sciences, on how to make medical research better meet market demand. A series of innovation and entrepreneurship talks will also be held, where speakers will have in-depth discussions on hot topics such as big data in finance, block chains, and unmanned boats.

For enquiries, please call 8822 8683 or 8822 2929.  or visit: https://ci.ici.umac.mo/ 


Source: Institute of Collaborative Innovation

Media Contact Information:
Communications Office, University of Macau

Albee Lei  Tel:(853) 88228004
Kelvin U  Tel:(853) 88224322
Email:prs.media@umac.mo

UM Website:www.umac.mo 

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<![CDATA[The Ship Captain at UM]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43317http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43317Source: My UM

Chan Kit Fong, a fourth-year student from the Department of Sociology, has dreamed of becoming a ship captain since childhood because of the influence of his father who was a maritime policeman. After trying his hand at sailing when he was in middle school, he fell in love with it. ‘It felt very liberating, without the constraints of the land,’ he says. To realise his childhood dream, he started taking courses in sailing in 2010. After seven years of hard work, he successfully obtained the captain’s license in July 2017.

The Most Difficult Part—Nautical Charts and Berthing

While studying for the captain’s license, Chan received guidance and help from many maritime professionals. His most unforgettable memory is that of learning to draw nautical charts. He had to learn how to measure angles and how to do dead reckoning, which were not easy. With the help of senior students and repeated practice, he gradually learned more about vessel planning, positioning, and safety tips. The GPS system sometimes malfunctions, so it is important to make a passage plan. With a passage plan, even if the GPS system malfunctions, the crew can still complete the rest of the voyage by relying on such instruments as the magnetic compass, the dumb compass, and the sextant, as well as the data obtained from the passage planning.

It is also important to prepare for contingencies at sea. Unlike a car, a ship doesn’t have a break, so the crew need to be mentally prepared for all possible contingencies at sea. For example, when an obstacle is detected, the crew must slow down the ship or change the direction. At night, when nothing is visible, the crew must pay attention to signals from other ships, such as sirens and lights, to determine the location of the ship.

Apart from dealing with contingencies, berthing is also a difficult part of the job, which Chan finds the most challenging. The choice of the berthing approach depends on various factors, including weather and water conditions. Even now, Chan still needs to practice berthing skills.‘There is no shortcut. I just have to practice more, drive slowly, stay alert to the surroundings, and make adjustments accordingly,’ he says.

Cherishing Time with Parents

Chan originally planned to go to Taiwan for college to study sailing. He even received an offer from a Taiwan college. But his mother hoped he could stay. Not sure how to decide, Chan remembered a piece of advice from a ship captain, ‘Marine perils are unpredictable. Once you enter this profession, there is a chance that you might not return from your job. So you might as well spend more time with your family while you still can.’ So Chan followed his mother’s suggestion and stayed in Macao for college. ‘I hope to spend more time with my family and take care of them when I still have the time and ability,’ he says. ‘I don’t want to regret when it’s too late that I didn’t cherish the time with my parents.’

Worth the Hard Work

Chan once took short-term courses at Dalian Maritime University and Dalian Ocean University. These courses made him realise that sailing rules and regulations vary from place to place. ‘No university in Macao offers programmes in sailing. So if you want to become a ship captain in Macao, it takes a long process,’ he says. ‘First you need to obtain a sailor’s license, then you need to obtain a near coastal captain’s license, and only after that can you try to apply for an ocean captains’ license. These exams require different types of knowledge.’ Apart from attending classes at UM during the day and taking sailing courses at night, Chan is also a member of the Macao Canoeing Team which requires weekly training. ‘Sometimes to prepare for major competitions, we have to undergo additional training,’ he says. ‘Of course it’s tiring, but I am working towards my goal, so it’s worth all the hard work.’ Chan feels sailing helps him become calmer and more observant. More importantly, it trains him to think on his feet. His background in sociology teaches him to analyse problems from different angles. ‘For example, in case of an accident at sea, I need to quickly identify the cause of the problem and think of ways to remedy the situation,’ he says.

Protecting Our Harbour

Becoming a ship captain is a goal Chan set seven years ago. He is very grateful to the maritime professionals who have provided guidance and help to him along the way. ‘Today, very few people are willing to work on a ship, because they think it’s boring,’ he says. ‘In the old days, each voyage took at least one or two weeks. Now even with the increased speed, still very few people are willing to enter this profession. So those who have helped me all hope that I could see things through.’

Chan loves working at sea. ‘Compared to working in an office, working at sea is more fun, more liberating, and more relaxing,’ he says. ‘I really hope to enter this profession. I also hope more and more young people will join me so we can protect our harbor together.’


How to obtain a captain’s license?

Step 1, Obtain a sailor’s license, which allows the license holder to drive a C2-class ship 
or a ship of a lower class 3nm to 5nm offshore during the daytime.

Step 2, Obtain a near coastal captain’s license, which allows the 
license holder to travel 25 to 30nm of fshore.

Step 3, Obtain an ocean captain’s license, which allows the license 
holder to drive a ship anywhere in the world.

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<![CDATA[UM to confer honorary degrees on Academician He Jingtang, Prof Henry T Yang, Dr Ada Yonath and Prof Zhong Binglin]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43332http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43332The University of Macau’s (UM) will confer the Doctor of Education honoris causa degree on Prof Zhong Binglin, Doctor of Science honoris causa degree on Academician He Jingtang, and Doctor of Science honoris causa degree on Dr Ada Yonath and Prof Henry T Yang.


Introduction to the Four Honorary Degree Recipients


Academician He Jingtang

A renowned architect, Academician He was born in Dongguan, Guangdong province on 2 April 1938. He graduated with a Master’s degree in architecture in 1965 from the South China Institute of Technology, now the South China University of Technology (SCUT). He has been working there as a professor, supervisor of doctoral students, director of the Architectural Design and Research Institute, honorary dean of the School of Architecture, as well as the chief architect. Besides his positions at SCUT, he was academician of the Chinese Academy of Engineering (CAE) in 1999 and a member of the Ninth and Tenth National Committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC). Currently he is director of the Education and Architecture Academic Committee under the Architectural Society China and director of the Academic Committee of the State Key Laboratory of Subtropical Building Science. 

Under the ‘two concepts’ and ‘three characters’ theory that he formulated, Academician He has been working hard to sustain traditional Chinese architecture and promote academic-research-commercialization integration. His world class works have earned him more than 100 first- and second-class awards at provincial and national levels. In addition, he has published more than 50 papers in Architectural Journal and supervised more than 80 doctoral and postdoctoral students. 

With his specializations in campus and exposition designs, as well as the design with salient cultural features as his tour de force, Academician He’s masterpieces included the China pavilion at Shanghai World Expo 2010, the Victory commemoration Hall as part of the expansion of the Memorial Hall of the Victims in Nanjing Massacre by Japanese Invaders, Da Chang Muslim Cultural Center, the Exhibition Hall of Evidence of Crime Committed by Unit 731 of the Japanese Imperial Army, Yingxiu Epicenter Memorial Site, Tianjin Museum, the Qian Xuesen Library and Museum, the Museum of the City Wall of the Ming and Qing Dynasties in Nanjing, the Museum of the Western Han Dynasty Mausoleum of the Nanyue King, Chongqing University of Technology, the University of Macau, the Shenzhen campus of Sun Yat-Sen University, and the Zhuhai Phoenix Tower. 

Hailed as the ‘Master of Engineering Design in China’ in 1994, Academician He was crowned with the first National Liang Sicheng Architecture Prize in 2001. He also has numerous other titles and awards tucked under his belt: the Ten Most Powerful People in Industries, the International Design Award for Lifetime Achievement, the CAE’s Guanghua Engineering Science and Technology Award, as well as the Guangdong Provincial Science and Technology Outstanding Contribution Award. In recognition of his education model to train architects, the Chinese Society of Academic Degrees and Graduate Education presented him the first prize of the Postgraduate Education Achievement Award. In 2009 which occasioned the 60th anniversary of the founding of the PRC, he became the winner of most awards presented by the Architectural Society of China in the history of the PRC. 

Over the years, Academician He has been invited by Harvard University, Politecnico Milano, the Università Iuav di Venezia (IUAV) and the University of Auckland, as well as other places like the UK and Spain, to give lectures. In October 2016, he held his exhibition themed ‘the Locale, the Culture, the Contemporaneity: the Design for a Rapidly Changing China’ at IUAV. The exhibition later toured in mainland universities such as Tongji University, Peking University, Harbin Institute of Technology, and Southwest Jiaotong University, receiving acclaims both at home and abroad.  


Professor Henry T. Yang

Professor Henry T. Yang has been the fifth chancellor of University of California, Santa Barbara since 1994.  Before that, he was the Neil A. Armstrong Distinguished Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Purdue University, where he also served as the dean of the College of Engineering for ten years and as a co-director of the NSF Engineering Research Center for Intelligent Manufacturing Systems. 

Professor Yang is a member of the US National Academy of Engineering (since 1991) and of Academia Sinica (since 1992), as well as a foreign member of the Chinese Academy of Engineering (since 2009) and of the Russian Academy of Engineering (since 2014).  He is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (since 1985), of the American Society for Engineering Education (since 1993), and of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (since 2008).  He is currently the chair of the Board of Governors of the Thirty Meter Telescope Observatory.  He also serves on the board of the Kavli Foundation, on the international academic advisory boards for South University of Science and Technology of China, Yenching Academy of Peking University, and University of Macau.  Since 1996, he has been serving on the selection board for the Ho Leung Ho Lee Foundation’s HLHL Prize in science and technology. 

Professor Yang has received numerous awards in recognition of his achievements in research, teaching and public service, including the Centennial Medallion in 1993, the Benjamin Garver Lamme Award from the American Society of Engineering Education in 1998, the Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials Award from the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics in 2008, the Arthur M Bueche Award from the US National Academy of Engineering in 2016, and seven honorary doctorates from Purdue University (1996), The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (2002), Taiwan University (2004), City University of Hong Kong Ministry of Education of Singapore (2007), and of the international advisory boards for Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology and The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (2010 – 2016).


Dr Ada Yonath

Dr Yonath was born in Jerusalem. She studied at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, received a PhD degree from the Weizmann Institute of Science, and completed her postdoctoral studies at Carnegie Mellon University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the United States. In the early 1970s, she established the first laboratory for protein crystallography in Israel, which in almost a decade to come, was the only laboratory of its kind in the country. 

Dr Yonath is an Israeli crystallographer best known for her pioneering work on the structure of ribosome. Since the end of the 1970s, she has been researching on the elucidation of the process of protein biosynthesis. She aimed to determine the three-dimensional structure of ribosome, which would reveal the mechanisms underlying protein biosynthesis. Crystals are the necessary elements to ascertain the spatial structure of ribosome at molecular level; however, the crystal of ribosome is extremely difficult to obtain. Dr Yonath developed a method to produce the initial microcrystals of ribosome in a short time using ribosome from bacteria living in extreme environments. Furthermore, she also introduced cryo-crystallography, a technique that is widely used in structural biology labs around the world today. In 2000 and 2001, the three-dimensional structures of both subunits of the bacterial ribosome were completed and published.

In 2009, she became the first Israeli woman out of her ten compatriot Nobel laureates to receive the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, along with Venkatraman Ramakrishnan and Thomas A Steitz, for her studies on the structure and function of ribosome. She was also the first woman in 45 years to win the Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

Dr Yonath was awarded the honorary doctorates by almost all of Israeli universities; Fuzhou University and Xiamen University, China; the Hong Kong Baptist University and the City University of Hong Kong; the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge, United Kingdom; New York University and Mount Sinai Universities, USA; the University of Hamburg, Germany; The University of Patras, Greece; the University of Oslo, Norway; and the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Japan.

She is the current director of the Helen and Milton A Kimmelman Center for Biomolecular Structure and Assembly of the Weizmann Institute of Science.

Dr Yonath shared the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Venkatraman Ramakrishnan and Thomas A Steitz for their studies on the structure and function of ribosomes, which are the tiny particles made up of RNA and proteins. These ribosomes specialise in protein synthesis and are found free from or bound to the endoplasmic within cells. 

Dr Yonath focuses on the mechanisms underlying protein biosynthesis by ribosomal crystallography, a research line she pioneered over twenty years ago despite considerable skepticism of the international scientific community at the time. Ribosomes translate RNA into protein and because they have slightly different structures in microbes from eukaryotes, such as human cells, they are often a target for antibiotics. Twenty years later, by determining the structures of both ribosomal subunits from eubacteria that serve as pathogen models, she elucidated the functions of several antibiotics targeting ribosomes.

Her research results made a great contribution to the medical profession. Some pathogens are resistant to antibiotics, thus making those antibiotics lose their effectiveness against bacterial infections. Therefore, sustaining its efficaciousness is a very important task for medical scientists. And Dr Yonath’s research to develop and perfect these drugs decidedly serves that purpose. 

Dr Yonath was born in Jerusalem in 1939. She entered the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and obtained a bachelor of science degree in chemistry in 1962 and a master of science degree in biochemistry in 1964 before earning a PhD degree in X-Ray crystallography in 1968 from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot.

After she moved to America, Dr Yonath began her academic and research careers with the Carnegie Mellon University and MIT together with F A Cotton and the 1976 Nobel laureate in chemistry, Harvard professor William Lipscomb Jr. From 1979 to 1984, she was a group leader at the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics in Berlin and headed their research unit in Hamburg from 1986 to 2004 as well as the Mazar Center of Structural Biology (1988-2004). She has been a professor at the Weizmann Institute of Science since 1988, heading the Kimmelman Center for Biomolecular Structure and Assembly since 1989. 

Dr Yonath was elected a member of the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities in 2000 and the US National Academy of Sciences in 2003. In addition to the Nobel Prize, she has received many other honours and awards throughout her career, including the Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize for Biology or Biochemistry in 2005, the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize in 2007, and the Albert Einstein World Award of Science in 2008.

Dr Yonath was one of the Nobel laureate speakers of the Macau Symposium on Biomedical Sciences 2015 organised by the Faculty of Health Science (FHS) of the University of Macau. She is currently a member of the advisory board of the FHS and was a member of the University of Macau International Advisory Committee from 1 September 2015 to 31 August 2016.  

Because of her great contributions to science as recognised by her winning of the Nobel Prize, we would like therefore to propose Dr Yonath for the honorary doctoral degree.


Prof Zhong Binglin 

Professor Binglin Zhong, current president of the Chinese Society of Education, is a renowned educationist. His contributions include, among others, nurturing talent, promoting higher education policy and research, initiating a raft of significant education programmes in China and fostering collaboration and exchange with other places.

Born in Beijing in 1951, Professor Zhong graduated in 1977 from Nanjing Institute of Technology – now Southeast University – where he also received a Master’s degree in Engineering in 1987. He obtained a PhD degree from the University of Wales in 1994; and became vice president of Southeast University in the same year. In 1996, he was appointed director-general of the Department of Higher Education at the Ministry of Education. As director-general, he initiated higher education reforms in governance and curriculum, as well as instituted quality assurance of bachelor’s degrees.

Between 2001 and 2012, Professor Zhong was president of Beijing Normal University whose motto is ‘learning to be a good teacher; serving oneself as a role model for others’. Under his presidency, Beijing Normal University re-positioned itself by re-examining the ideals according to which its education had been run and by pinpointing some specific disciplinary areas for priority development. As a result of these measures, he transformed Beijing Normal University into a comprehensive research university featuring teacher education, educational science and the arts and science foundation courses.

Busy administrative schedules aside, Professor Zhong is also active in research and teaching. He has published his works extensively, with more than 100 papers in such key academic journals as Educational Research, Journal of Higher Education and China Higher Education. Besides, Professor Zhong serves as honorary vice president at Cardiff University and honorary professor at Aalborg University in Denmark. He also received the honorary degree of Doctor of Education from the Education University of Hong Kong, and the honorary degree of Doctor of Letters from the Open University of Hong Kong. 

In 2012, Professor Zhong was elected as president of the Chinese Society of Education and has held the position since then.

Professor Zhong’s relationship with Macao began when Beijing Normal University was commissioned to run the first training course for Chinese teachers in Macao primary and secondary schools. As the then president of the university, Professor Zhong was a keynote speaker on that occasion. 

Of all those titles that he received, perhaps there is none that he prizes more than his being addressed by the mere name of a ‘teacher’.



Source:  Communications Office

Media Contact Information:
Communications Office, University of Macau

Albee Lei  Tel:(853) 88228004
Kelvin U  Tel:(853) 88224322
Email:prs.media@umac.mo

UM Website:www.umac.mo 

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<![CDATA[Big Data on UM Freshmen]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43305http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43305Source: My UM

This year UM welcomed 1,703 new freshmen. Guess how many of them are male, and how many are female? What is the surname shared by the most new students? Let’s check out some interesting numbers.

Are there more male students or female students at UM?
There is an old Chinese saying that goes, ‘Women hold up half the sky’. It is certainly the case in Macao, where females outnumber males. The same is true at UM. Of all the new students admitted this year, 965 are females, and 738 are males (a ratio of 1.3:1). The Faculty of Business Administration has the most new students—540, which is 23 times the number in the Faculty of Health Sciences, which has the fewest new students (23).

What is the surname shared by
the most students? If you shout ‘Chan’ in the Central Teaching Building, more than 100 students would respond, because ‘Chan’ is the surnamed shared by the most new students (158), followed by Lei (1 19), Wong (106), Leong (85), and Cheong (78). Special surnames include Pin, Chow , Ni, Cham, Lao, Pi, Hua, and Heung.

What’s the most popular name at UM?
What is the most popular name among new students at UM? Turns out it is ‘Chon Kit’, shared by eight students. Of all the female names, Weng Ian, Ka Man, and Hio Tong are the most popular , each shared by seven students. According to data from the past few years, Ka Man and Ka Chon are both popular names.

Is today your birthday?
Most of the students have their birthdays during the summer holiday . 1 July and 20 September are two birthdays shared by the most new students, each shared by 13 students. They are followed by 28 May , 30 October , and 15 November , each shared by 1 1 students. July is the birth month shared by the most new students (167).

In terms of zodiac signs, Leo is shared by the most students (172), while Taurus is shared by the fewest students (109).

Who are the youngest new students?
Most new students admitted this year were born in 1999, the same year Macao returned to the motherland. 858 students were born in 1999. This is followed by the year 1998, when 491 students were born. The three youngest new students were born in 2001. The oldest new student was born in the 1970s. They say it is never too old to learn. This student’ s commitment to lifelong learning is indeed admirable.

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<![CDATA[Physics camp closing ceremony and physics contest award ceremony held at UM]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43309http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43309The closing ceremony for a physics camp organised by the Centre of Physics Olympiad of Macao, was held at the University of Macau (UM) yesterday. This year’s event attracted over 50 secondary school students. It received support from UM’s Institute of Applied Physics and Materials Engineering and sponsorship from the Education and Youth Affairs Bureau and the Science and Technology Development Fund. Participating students say the event increased their interest in physics and they have benefited greatly from the games and experiments during the event. In addition, the award ceremony for winners of the 27th national competition in applied physics from Macao was held on the same day.

For the full version, please refer to the Chinese version.


Source: Institute of Applied Physics and Materials Engineering

Media Contact Information:
Communications Office, University of Macau

Albee Lei  Tel:(853) 88228004
Kelvin U  Tel:(853) 88224322
Email:prs.media@umac.mo

UM Website:www.umac.mo 

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<![CDATA[UM wins 3 golds at national inter-varsity martial arts tournament]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43286http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43286Four students from the University of Macau (UM) Martial Arts Team recently won three gold medals at a national inter-varsity martial arts tournament held in Loudi, Hunan province. The competition attracted 894 contestants from 88 universities in China.

For the full version, please refer to the Chinese version

Source: Office of Sports Affairs

Media Contact Information:
Communications Office, University of Macau

Albee Lei  Tel:(853) 88228004
Kelvin U  Tel:(853) 88224322
Email:prs.media@umac.mo
UM Website:www.umac.mo

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<![CDATA[Congratulations to UM members on inauguration as Legislative Assembly members]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43288http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43288Members of the Sixth Legislative Assembly of Macau took their oath of office today (16 October). The University of Macau (UM) would like to congratulate the following university members on their inauguration as Legislative Assembly members.

 

UM staff:

.Department of Communication Associate Professor Agnes Lam

.Rector’s Office Director Lao Chi Ngai

.Institute for the Study of Commercial Gaming Director Fong Ka Chio

.Faculty of Law Assistant Dean Iau Teng Pio

 

UM alumni

.José Pereira Coutinho

.Au Kam San

.Becky Song

.Vong Hin Fai

.Chan Hong 

.Chan Wa Keong


Source: Communications Office

Media Contact Information:
Communications Office, University of Macau

Albee Lei  Tel:(853) 88228004
Kelvin U  Tel:(853) 88224322
Email:prs.media@umac.mo

UM Website:www.umac.mo

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<![CDATA[UM students receives Best Student of Portuguese Award from Casa de Portugal]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43274http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43274Ao Ieong Ka Hou, a fourth-year student from the University of Macau (UM) Department of Portuguese, recently received the Best Student of Portuguese Award from the Casa de Portugal em Macau (The Home of Portugal in Macao), for finishing Portuguese studies with the best result.

The award ceremony took place in Casa de Portugal em Macau. The award was presented by Victor Sereno, consul general of Portugal in Macao; and Maria Amélia António, president of Casa de Portugal em Macau. Ao Ieong says that he enjoys studying Portuguese in Macao because Portuguese is an official language in Macao. He adds that studying Portuguese at UM has helped him develop a strong interest in language studies and he plans to pursue further education in Latin in the United Kingdom after graduation.

In addition, Ao Ieong says that Portuguese is a poetic language, so he focuses more on sentence structures and intonation. He loves the novel O Mandarim written by Eça de Queiroz and poems written by Fernando Pessoa.


Source: Communications Office

Media Contact Information:
Communications Office, University of Macau

Albee Lei  Tel:(853) 88228004
Kelvin U  Tel:(853) 88224322
Email:prs.media@umac.mo

UM Website:www.umac.mo

 

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<![CDATA[UM holds E-Sport Day]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43280http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/43280