UM News http://www.umac.mo/ $title en_us hourly 1<![CDATA[UM’s vice rector chairs AULP’s Board of Administrators meeting]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/41194http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/41194The Board of Administrators of the Association of Portuguese Speaking Universities (AULP) held a meeting at its headquarters in Lisbon. The meeting was attended by ten tertiary institutions from Portuguese-speaking countries and Macao, which serve as the president or members of the Board of Administrators, Board of Supervisors, and Secretariat General.

Vice Rector Rui Martins chaired the meeting on behalf of the University of Macau, which is the president of the AULP. Participants discussed the headquarters’ activities in the past six months and summarised the key points of the 26th annual meeting held in East Timor.

Other main items on the meeting’s agenda included: launching the 2017 Fernão Mendes Pinto Award, releasing the minutes of the 26th annual meeting of the AULP (which was focused on academic mobility and globalisation within the Community of Portuguese Speaking Countries (CPLP) and Macao), and publishing RILP (Volume 3, Issue 28/29, 2015, and Volume 3, Issue 30, 2016). Participants also discussed matters related to the preparation for the 27th annual meeting of the AULP, which will be held from 10 July to 12 July in Campinas, Brazil. The meeting is now open for registrations.

At the AULP’s 24th annual meeting held in Macao, UM was elected president of the association, for a three-year term (from 2014 to 2017). With members consisting of over 140 universities and other research and educational institutions from CPLP countries and Macao, the AULP takes as its mission to promote the communication between its members as well as the development of education and the Portuguese language worldwide.

Source: Communications Office 

Media Contact Information:
Communications Office, University of Macau

Albee Lei  Tel:(853) 88228004
Kelvin U  Tel:(853) 88224322
Email:prs.media@umac.mo
UM Website:www.umac.mo

]]>
<![CDATA[UM scholar receives Young Researcher Award]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/41118http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/41118Dr Lei Ka Meng from the University of Macau (UM) State Key Laboratory of Analog and Mixed-Signal VLSI and Faculty of Science and Technology, who is also a Macao Fellow, received the Young Researcher Award from the International Institute of Macau, for his research project, ‘Miniaturized Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Platforms for Chemical/Biological Assays with Customized CMOS Integrated Circuits’. The awarded project is part of Lei’s PhD thesis. Lei received a Distinguished Design Award at the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Asian Solid-State Circuits Conference 2015 and a Predoctoral Achievement Award from the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society at the 64th International Solid-State Circuits Conference.

Source: Communications Office 

Media Contact Information:
Communications Office, University of Macau

Albee Lei  Tel:(853) 88228004
Kelvin U  Tel:(853) 88224322
Email:prs.media@umac.mo
UM Website:www.umac.mo

]]>
<![CDATA[UM inaugurates Centre for Chinese History and Culture to promote Chinese culture to the world]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/41164http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/41164The University of Macau (UM) today (24 February) held an inauguration ceremony for its Centre for Chinese History and Culture. The centre aims to promote research in Chinese history and culture, increase the dissemination and influence of Chinese history and culture in Portuguese-speaking countries, and enhance Macao residents’ understanding of Chinese history and culture. Chan Hoi Fan, acting chief executive of the Macao SAR, believes that the establishment of the centre will enable UM to consolidate its resources and maximise its strengths in order to make a strong contribution to the study and promotion of Chinese history and culture.

Officiating guests at the inauguration ceremony were Chan Hoi Fan, acting chief executive of the Macao SAR; Wang Zhimin, director of the Liaison Office of the Central People's Government in the Macao SAR; Xue Xiaofeng, deputy director of the Liaison Office of the Central People's Government in the Macao SAR; Tam Chon Weng, secretary for social affairs and culture of the Macao SAR; Liu Jin, director of the Hong Kong, Macao and Taiwan Affairs Office of the Ministry of Education; Liu Guiqin, director of the Department of Social Sciences of the Ministry of Education; Lam Kam Seng, chair of UM’s University Council; Wei Zhao, rector of UM; and Hao Yufan, dean of UM’s Faculty of Social Sciences.

Chan Hoi Fan said in her speech that Macao is an important ‘bridge’ connecting China and Portuguese-speaking countries. For this reason, developing research in Chinese history and culture in Macao will directly contribute to the dissemination of Chinese culture in Portuguese-speaking countries, which will increase the international exchange and influence of Chinese culture. Chan believes that the Centre for Chinese History and Culture will provide a good platform for young people to learn about Chinese history and culture. She added that since its establishment, UM has made a lot of effort in increasing its teaching and research capacity in the field, and the university now possesses not only first-class facilities but also a core group of nationally and internationally known experts and scholars. She expressed confidence that the establishment of the centre will enable the university to consolidate its resources and maximise its strengths in order to make a strong contribution to the study and promotion of Chinese history and culture.

Xue Xiaofeng said that the culture of Macao has the same origin as Chinese culture, Lingnan culture, and especially Xiangshan culture. He added that since its establishment as a trading port, Macao has been an important hub for economic and cultural exchange between China and Western countries, where Chinese and Western cultures coexist in harmony, and the city is of academic and research importance. Xue added that he has four expectations for the Centre for Chinese History and Culture. First, he hopes that the centre can help to promote traditional Chinese culture and become an important platform for cultivating patriotism, tolerance, and practicality among Macao’s youth. Second, he hopes the centre grasps the opportunity offered by Macao’s ‘One Centre, One Platform’ policy and take part in China’s ‘One Belt, One Road’ strategy, adding that the centre is crucial for disseminating Chinese history and culture and demonstrating the vitality of the ‘One Country, Two Systems’ policy to overseas countries, especially Portuguese-speaking countries. Third, Xue hopes that the centre can make full use of the advantages of Macao as a melting pot of Chinese and Western cultures to foster greater confidence in Chinese history and culture. Fourth, Xue hopes that the centre can maximise UM’s strengths in its academic disciplines and help the university consolidate its resources in disciplines such as social sciences, arts and humanities, and education. He also hopes that the centre can help to nurture local teachers in the humanities and provide course materials in Chinese history and geography for local secondary and primary schools.

Wei Zhao said that the Centre for Chinese History and Culture belongs not only to UM, but also to Macao, China, and the world. He added that as a flagship higher education institution in Macao, China, UM has the responsibility to promote the study and the development of Chinese history and culture. He also said that faculty members and students should use their knowledge of history and their research achievements to strengthen the interaction between China and the rest of the world, as a means of further implementing China’s policy to promote Chinese culture abroad.

The Centre for Chinese History and Culture has been listed by the Ministry of Education as a key research platform in the areas of humanities and social sciences. UM will jointly develop this state-level research platform with Tsinghua University and East China Normal University. During the ceremony, representatives of the three universities signed a letter of intent under the witness of more than 100 guests. The universities will collaborate with one another in promoting academic exchange and research activities in the areas of Chinese history and culture.


Source: Faculty of Social Sciences 

Media Contact Information:
Communications Office, University of Macau

Albee Lei  Tel:(853) 88228004
Kelvin U  Tel:(853) 88224322
Email:prs.media@umac.mo
UM Website:www.umac.mo



]]>
<![CDATA[Plaque Unveiling Ceremony for the Centre for Chinese History and Culture]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/41082http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/41082Press Invitation
Name : Plaque Unveiling Ceremony for the Centre for Chinese History and Culture
Organizer : University of Macau
Date : 24 February 2017 (Friday)
Time : 5:00 pm
Venue : E2, Auditorium of Wu Yee Sun Library, University of Macau
Content : UM’s Centre for Chinese History and Culture has been listed by the Ministry of Education as a key research platform in the areas of humanities and social sciences. UM will jointly develop this state-level platform with Tsinghua University and East China Normal University. Chan Hoi Fan, acting chief executive of the Macao SAR; Wang Zhimin, director general of the Liaison Office of the Central People's Government in Macao; Xue Xiaofeng, deputy director general of the Liaison Office; and Tam Chon Weng, secretary for social affairs and culture of the Macao SAR, will attend the ceremony.
Language : English , Mandarin

Contact Person for Details

Name : Communications Office
Tel. No : 88224322
Fax : 88222359
Email : prs.media@umac.mo
Remark : For car parking reservation, please contact us one day in advance.
]]>
<![CDATA[Scholars give talks on African countries, cultures at UM]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/41093http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/41093Africa may be a mysterious place for students living thousands of miles away in Macao. Therefore, the University of Macau (UM) Research Centre for Luso-Asian Studies invited four guest scholars from Portuguese-speaking countries in Africa to share their experiences and provide some information about their home countries. The event took place at Chao Kuang Piu College (CKPC).


The sharing sessions were conducted in Portuguese, so CKPC arranged several master’s students of Portuguese-Chinese translation to provide simultaneous interpretation into Mandarin. Besides geographic and demographic information, each speaker told the audience some interesting facts about their home countries. The four scholars come from Angola, Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, and São Tomé and Príncipe.


Prof Rosa Cruz e Silva comes from Agostinho Neto University, the first public university in Angola. She told the audience about the importance of the Portuguese language in Angola and the country’s marine products and wood resources.


Prof Crisanto Barros, who comes from the University of Cape Verde, said the situation is the opposite in Cape Verde. Although Portuguese is the official language, Cape Verdean Creole is more widely used in people’s daily lives. Barros also pointed out that there are more Cape Verdean living abroad than home, with an estimate of 1 million living overseas (including Macao).


Prof Odete Semedo comes from Amilcar Cabral University in Guinea-Bissau. She provided some geographic and demographic information about her home country, with a detailed explanation on its administrative division. She added that Guinea-Bissau used to be two separate countries.


Fernanda Pontifice, rector of the Lusiada University, São Tomé and Príncipe, told the audience about São Tomé and Príncipe, the smallest Portuguese-speaking country. He said that the country is consisted of two main islands and four creole languages coexist in the country despite its small size.


Source: Communications Office 

Media Contact Information:
Communications Office, University of Macau

Albee Lei  Tel:(853) 88228004
Kelvin U  Tel:(853) 88224322
Email:prs.media@umac.mo
UM Website:www.umac.mo


]]>
<![CDATA[Collaborative research by UM and NCI brings new hope to cancer patients]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/41051http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/41051Prof Chen Xin from the State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine, Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences, University of Macau (UM), and Dr Joost J Oppenheim from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), United States National Institutes of Health (NIH), have made significant progress in a collaborative research project on safer and more effective treatment for cancer and autoimmune diseases. They found that targeting tumor necrosis factor receptor type II (TNFR2) can enhance anti-tumour immune responses and kill cancer cells, bringing new hope to cancer patients. The related findings have been published in Science Signaling under Science magazine.

Prof Chen has conducted a series of groundbreaking studies on TNFR2’s role in the proper function and proliferation of T lymphocytes. Although counterintuitive and contrary to all previous reports, his research results have been replicated by many research groups from around the world, revolutionising the scientific community’s understanding of the subject. Scientists have been searching for safer and more effective treatment for cancer and autoimmune diseases based on the discoveries made by Prof Chen. A new cancer immunotherapy developed by a research team led by Prof Faustman from Harvard Medical School based on Prof Chen’s research findings has been hailed as one of the most important breakthroughs in tumour research.

In addition, Prof Chen has been invited by the Frontiers in Immunology journal to co-edit The Role of TNF-TNFR2 Signal in Immunosuppressive Cells and its Therapeutic Implications with Prof Magdalena Plebanski from Monash University in Australia.

Prof Chen joined UM in 2014. Prior to that, he was a senior scientist at NCI for 15 years and received the Director's Innovation Award in 2010. Currently he is a research collaborator of the NCI. 

Source: Communications Office 

Media Contact Information:
Communications Office, University of Macau

Albee Lei  Tel:(853) 88228004
Kelvin U  Tel:(853) 88224322
Email:prs.media@umac.mo
UM Website:www.umac.mo


]]>
<![CDATA[UM to hold University Lecture on artificial intelligence industry]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/41019http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/41019The University of Macau (UM) will hold the third lecture of its University Lecture Series, titled ‘From Big Data to AI: An Industrial Perspective’, on Wednesday 1 March. Dr Zhang Hongjiang, former executive director and CEO of Kingsoft and former managing director of Microsoft Advanced Technology Center, will be the keynote speaker. He will discuss the driving forces, such as big data, computing power, and new algorithms, behind the breakthroughs in artificial intelligence in recent years and the importance of big data.

The lecture will start at 5:00pm, in Lecture Hall G062, Anthony Lau Building (E4). It will be conducted in Mandarin, with simultaneous interpretation into English. All are welcome. For registration, please visit https://isw.umac.mo/evm/register/uls_zhang. For enquiries, please call 8822 8061. 

For full version, please refer to the Chinese version


Source: Communications Office 

Media Contact Information:
Communications Office, University of Macau

Albee Lei  Tel:(853) 88228004
Kelvin U  Tel:(853) 88224322
Email:prs.media@umac.mo
UM Website:www.umac.mo


]]>
<![CDATA[UM members celebrate International Mother Language Day]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/41020http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/41020

While it is not hard to identify foreign students at the University of Macau (UM), knowing the native languages they speak might be a bit challenging because more languages are used on our campus than ever. Therefore, UM professors and students from around the world gathered to celebrate the International Mother Language Day. They embraced linguistic and cultural diversity by reciting poems and singing in their mother tongue.

The event began with the Italian student Veronica Valle sharing her view on love by reciting one of her favourite poems, Inferno Canto XXVI, by Danite Alighieri. Valle ended her poetry recital by translating the most significant lines into English: 

‘Consider the seed that gave you birth:
you were not made to live as brutes,
but to be followers of worth and knowledge’

Besides languages that are commonly used on campus, such as Cantonese, Mandarin, English and Portuguese, some participants also spoke French, Brazilian, African languages, Japanese, and Korean.

Language is one of the most powerful tools for preserving our cultural heritage that defines who we are. ‘Our mother tongue shapes us in a way. It shapes how we think, how we view the world, how we view each other, at least in the first few years when we first started to speak our mother tongue,’ says Katrine Wong, one of the event hosts and associate professor from the Faculty of Arts and Humanities.

Prof Wong also explains the connection between this event and this year’s theme,‘Towards Sustainable Futures through Multilingual Education’. ‘(Since there are) a lot of attacks and arguments everywhere, we really need to learn how to respect and accept each other's cultures and languages. And by doing so, we can then have a better understanding of what exactly being a human being or being a world citizen is,’ she says. With an increasing international population on campus, she feels a strong need to celebrate this event, and she is grateful to her colleagues for ‘pulling people together’.

Inocência Mata, one of the event hosts and associate professor from the Faculty of Arts and Humanities, says that the celebration aims to encourage linguistic diversity and multilingual education on campus. ‘We want to help our students develop fuller awareness of linguistic and cultural traditions throughout the world and to inspire solidarity based on understanding, tolerance and dialogue,’ she says.

The International Mother Language Day, held annually on 21 February, was established by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in 1999 to raise awareness of languages around the world and to promote cultural diversity.


Source: Communications Office 

Media Contact Information:
Communications Office, University of Macau

Albee Lei  Tel:(853) 88228004
Kelvin U  Tel:(853) 88224322
Email:prs.media@umac.mo
UM Website:www.umac.mo


]]>
<![CDATA[How College Associate Master William Lee Becomes a Chef]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/41031http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/41031

Source: My UM

Taking off his suit jacket and putting on his apron, William Lee Wee Keng, associate master of Cheng Yu Tung College, turns into the college’s master chef when he cooks for his students. His dishes can easily attract food-loving students from the college, who would get together and share the food like a family. Known affectionately as ‘daddy’ among his students, Lee does not cook to satisfy his need to eat. Instead, he enjoys cooking as a hobby and loves the satisfaction he gets from sharing food with others. Lee thinks that home-cooked food can increase students’ sense of belonging and make the university feel like a home.

Cooking Hometown Dishes to Combat Loneliness

Lee was born in a Hakka family in Malaysia. His grandfather was a local chef who could cook all kinds of dishes. Under the influence of his grandfather, everyone in Lee’s family became a connoisseur of food and Lee developed a strong interest in cooking. Coming from a family of limited means, Lee’s grandfather would cook stuffed tofu for him as nutritional supplements. When Lee grew older, he started to learn more about Southeast Asian culture and taught himself to cook.

After graduating from the University of Malaysia, Lee went to the United States alone with USD 400 to pursue further studies at the University of Texas at Austin. In order to earn tuition fees and living expenses, he worked in a restaurant in the Chinatown of Atlanta as a waiter and was later promoted to manager. ‘During the years I worked in the restaurant, I learned to cook different kinds of dishes,’ he says. ‘It was not easy to study and work at the same time, but I felt happy to find a job that suited my interest.’

Studying abroad can be a lonely experience. Luckily, Lee cooked his hometown dishes to combat this loneliness. ‘Whenever I missed my family, I would cook a hometown dish. My favourite dish is the stuffed tofu that my grandfather used to cook for me,’ he says. ‘Even today I often make this dish for my students.’ Cooking hometown dishes not only brings back Lee’s childhood memories, but also reminds him of his grandfather.

Although Lee was a poor overseas student, he liked to invite classmates with similar backgrounds to dine together. ‘I usually bought the cheapest ingredients. If you know how to cook, you can make tasty dishes out of the simplest ingredients,’ he says. ‘The gatherings gave me an excuse to bring my friends together. The food was also an encouragement to us during the hard times.’

Late Night Snacks Popular among Students

After joining UM, Lee carried forward his cooking philosophy to his residential college. He is usually very busy with work and only has time to cook during weekends or holidays. Lee likes to invite his students to dine with him in his home. Before the final week of each semester, Lee would prepare late night snacks for the students, and the food would be enough for about 60 people. ‘It is very tiring to cook for so many people, but I also feel very happy,’ he says. ‘During the final week, students usually study late into the night. After finishing the late night snacks, they would return to their bedrooms and continue working for the exams. I think the food can make our college feel like a home.’ In fact, one of the goals of the residential college system is to foster a sense of belonging among the students. Lee loves his students and treats them like his children, and cooking food is his way of expressing his love for them.

Whenever Lee is home, he leaves his door open so his students can walk in at any time to talk to him. His home was full of the smell of bak-kut-teh when our reporter visited him. At the time, Lee, dressed in an apron, was chopping tofu in the kitchen. He told the reporter that his signature dish is stuffed tofu, which was a really humble answer because later that day he served his students and the reporter with seven dishes, namely Korean bean sprout salad, meatballs with radish, braised duck with ginger, sautéed celery with dried tofu slices, braised winged bean with shrimps, bak-kut-teh, and taro and tapioca pearl dessert. The guests were all very impressed that Lee managed to prepare so many dishes in just a little over an hour. Lee smiled and said: ‘Of course I didn’t! The duck and sprout salad were prepared the night before and were kept overnight in the fridge. Leaving them overnight makes them tastier.’

While everyone was enjoying the food, Lee only watched quietly. When asked why he did not eat anything, he says: ‘I feel very happy when I see my students eat and chat like a family. I enjoy cooking more than eating. Besides, I don’t eat much nowadays because I am watching my weight.’

Winning a Girl’s Heart with Cooking

Lee shared his secret of winning the heart of his girlfriend in our interview. According to Lee, he met his girlfriend in the United States and captured her heart with home-cooked congee and dishes. They have been dating ever since. Although his girlfriend is living in Taiwan while he is working here in Macao, they still love each other very much. Lee says they are a good match for each other. ‘She is a picky eater and I am a good cook,’ he says. Do you have a secret crush on someone? Chef Lee might just have given you a recipe for winning that person's heart! 

]]>
<![CDATA[UM again shines at ‘Chip Olympics’]]> http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/40991http://webcontent.co.umac.mo/umac_wp/news-centre/news-and-events/news-and-press-releases/detail/40991A team of faculty members and students from the University of Macau’s (UM) State-Key Laboratory of Analog and Mixed-Signal VLSI (AMS-VLSI Lab) presented their research findings at the 64th IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) held in San Francisco, the United States. Six papers from UM were accepted at this year’s conference, making the university one of the top institutions with the most papers presented at the 64th ISSCC. This shows international recognition of UM’s leading position in the field in Asia.

A total of 208 papers were accepted at this year’s conference. Among them 11 are from the Greater China region, with 6 from UM, 4 from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, and 1 from Analog Devices Inc. The papers deal with five broad subjects, namely wireless communication, RF circuits, digital structure and system, data transformation, and analogue circuits.

Lei Kameng, a doctor of microelectronics and Macao Fellow at UM, received the Pre-doctoral Achievement Award from the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society at the conference, in recognition of his outstanding research in the field. Two other PhD students from the lab were invited to make presentations in the Student Research Previews section

UM professors U Seng-Pan and Mak Pui-In, deputy director and associate director (research) of the lab, have been invited to serve as members of the Technical Programme Committee of the ISSCC, which has four members from mainland China, Hong Kong and Macao. The other two members are from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, and Fudan University, respectively. In addition, Prof U is currently the China Representative of the ISSCC Technical Programme Committee, responsible for the coordination of ISSCC activities in China.

Organised by the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society and internationally recognised as the Chip Olympics, the ISSCC is the most prestigious international conference in the field of semiconductor integrated circuits, with a rigorous paper selection process. It is also the world’s largest and highest-level conference on solid-state circuits, representing the latest trends in global solid-state circuit research and development. This year’s conference attracted more than 3,000 chip designers from around the world.  

Source: Communications Office 

Media Contact Information:
Communications Office, University of Macau

Albee Lei  Tel:(853) 88228004
Kelvin U  Tel:(853) 88224322
Email:prs.media@umac.mo
UM Website:www.umac.mo



]]>